Fighting Drought One Lawn at a Time: LADWP’s Cash In Your Lawn Program


One hundred percent of California is now in a severe drought, and Los Angeles County is even worse off, classified by the United States Drought Monitor  as in “extreme drought” conditions. Now, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is calling on Angelenos to do their part to conserve water—and as an incentive, they’ve upped their turf replacement rebate from $2 per square foot to $3.… Read more >>

Community Sustainability Workshop helps Angelenos respond to the drought

new photo 2

The drought is here and with a heat wave to boot, Angelenos are starting to feel the effects of climate change. To help community members learn what they can do to create a more sustainable LA and help slow climate change, TreePeople held a Community Sustainability Workshop at our headquarters on May 3rd. Roughly 100 people attended, ready to learn how to harvest rain, rip up their lawns, create native plant landscapes, and plant trees in their communities.

At the event, people were thrilled to learn that they can make an impact.… Read more >>

Saving Money & Saving Water—It Just Makes Sense!

Rain Barrel

Did you notice the recent rain we had? If you were at our rainwater harvesting workshop, not only did you get a chance to see our watershed garden in action, but you were able to take a rain barrel home for only $10!

That’s right. Thanks to a great incentive through SoCal Water Smart, most Los Angeles county residents are eligible to receive a rebate of up to $75 per barrel. So workshop participants learned how to make every drop of rain count, and then were able to go home with barrels all for less than the cost of a dinner out.… Read more >>

Why 57 Million Monarchs Matter

Monarch Butterfly

In case you missed it in The New York Times, “This year, for the first time in memory, the monarch butterflies didn’t come, at least not on the Day of the Dead. They began to straggle in a week later than usual, in record-low numbers. Last year’s low of 60 million now seems great compared with the fewer than three million that have shown up so far this year. Some experts fear that the spectacular migration could be near collapse.”

WOW!…

Transform the Landscape of your Home and Neighborhood—Free Workshops December 7

Community Sustainability Workshop

Have you ever wondered how to move away from a thirsty planted landscape to a more climate appropriate one? How you could get more trees, greenery and shade in your neighborhood without needing a huge amount of additional water? How you could do your part to prevent water pollution and save water by collecting rain?

Well, wonder no more. TreePeople is offering its next round of FREE, quarterly Community Sustainability Workshops for people ready to take on the role of making their homes, neighborhoods and communities more sustainable.… Read more >>

Taking on the Tyranny of Turf

Tyranny of Turf

It’s lining up to be another dry winter, with water reserves at worryingly low levels. So what’s with L.A.’s obsession with expansive green lawns? How did this landscape ideal, imported from rainy Northern Europe, come to mean the good life in water-scarce Los Angeles? Can we keep it up, or is there a better way? Is the better way possibly even more beautiful?

On Sunday, November 17 at 3pm, TreePeople will partner with the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West to answer some of these questions.… Read more >>

The Real Eco Choice for Southwest Landscapes

Is the summer heat leaving you feeling a bit parched? Perhaps your landscaping is thirsty, too? If so, you’re not alone. People all over the southwestern United States are realizing that our traditional green lawn landscapes are more difficult and expensive to keep watered in hot, dry years like this one. So much so that cities are actually paying residents to rip-up their grass and replace it with climate-appropriate plants.

No matter where you stand on the aesthetics of the issue, the fact is that losing the lawn allows cities to reduce water consumption—amazingly, by up to a third—even while the population grows.… Read more >>