Honor Earth Mamas and Mother Earth with Tree Dedications

Photo: Vahagn Karapetyan

One of our favorite holidays, Earth Day, is on April 22. Close on its heels is Mother’s Day. What better way to celebrate both occasions than by helping to reforest our parks and woodlands? It’s way more meaningful than a bouquet (we think).

From now through April 12, you can make at least two people happy with our special offer on tree dedications. Dedicate a tree to be planted for Earth Day and we’ll give you a 50% discount on a second tree dedicated to your mom–or anyone you love–for Mother’s Day!… Read more >>

Planting Fruit Trees in Food Deserts


The USDA Economic Research Service publishes the Food Environment Atlas to document, county by county throughout the United States, the percentage of households with limited access to grocery stores—and therefore to adequate nutrition. The interactive map aims to provide a spatial overview of communities’ abilities to access healthy food, but, so far, it doesn’t allow users to drill down to the level of neighborhoods.

In Los Angeles County, known “food deserts” include areas of South L.A. and the Northeast San Fernando Valley.… Read more >>

Three Big Days, One Simple Act

While April 22 is just around the corner and Earth Day is a wonderful time to reflect and celebrate this incredible planet, this month there are two other days that highlight hugely important environmental issues. March 21 is International Day of Forests and March 22 is World Water Day.

How to celebrate? After all, these days commemorate such enormous global issues. If I had to choose one action, it would be this: plant a tree.

With the simple act of planting a tree, each of us can help maintain the urban forest and shift the water crisis, all with one easy but profound step.… Read more >>

Human Help Needed to Restore Nature to the Angeles Forest


The devastating Station Fire of 2009 destroyed 160,000 acres of wilderness in the Angeles National Forest in the mountains surrounding Los Angeles—and fully 11,000 of those acres burned too deep in the soil for natural seed regeneration. So every season TreePeople and the U.S. Forest Service need lots of extra hands to help plant trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.

We’re in the third planting season with our partners at Forest Aid: Angeles. To meet our 2013 goal we must plant 5,000 more seedlings than last year—for a total of 15,000 new trees.… Read more >>

How TreePeople Catches Every Drop

Jim Hardie, TreePeople 216,000 gallon cistern

Is Los Angeles a desert? Our city gets about 15 inches of rainfall annually, slightly more precipitation than, say, Missoula, Montana (though we have fewer days per year that are considered “wet”). Did you know this is enough to serve a fairly large population and irrigate its urban greenery?

But every time it rains an inch in the city of L.A., 3.8 billion gallons of runoff are sent to sea, sweeping trash, toxins, and bacteria into waterways and polluting our beaches and ocean.… Read more >>

A Valentines Day tour of your local sewage treatment plant?

Seeking inspiration on how to spend Valentine’s Day?  Check out this idea: Brooklyn Sewage Treatment Plant to Hold Valentines Day Tours Again.

What makes this such a sell-out event on the other coast?  NPR reported that perhaps it is the pheromones that makes this unusual tour part of the hipsters’ bucket list, but maybe it’s more.

Maybe people are really wanting to connect with each other about things that matter…like the quality of our water.  Maybe Super Storm Sandy is making folks want to get a bit more eco-literate and brush up on the water cycle info they got back in 6th grade science class. … Read more >>

Learn How to Get Your Landscape Really Green


You may have noticed that some years in Los Angeles County are wetter—or drier—than others. And in wet years you may also have noticed a lot of unfiltered water rushing off paved surfaces, into storm drains, and out to sea carrying whatever pollutants it washes over. So, not only are we losing water that could be captured for local use or returned to the ground for irrigation, we’re failing to clean it up before it enters our waterways.

But did you know that even in times of drought, what little moisture falls from the sky can be harvested and put to use?… Read more >>