How Did Our Water Get Here?


Here in LA, we expect to see clean drinking water flowing anytime we turn on a faucet. But have you ever wondered where that water comes from?

Tap water in the City of LA comes from several sources — and about 90% of it is imported. The sources we rely on primarily include:  

The Colorado River Basin and the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta  

Water from these two regions is managed by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). MWD is a water wholesaler (they sell to cities and utility agencies, which in turn sell to the public).Read more >>

Speak Up for LA’s Water Future


El Niño isn’t panning out to be the drought buster we had hoped.

Despite the recent rain, scientists believe prolonged drought is in California’s future. We shouldn’t be surprised. The links between climate change and extreme weather patterns are undeniable. Weather satellites marked February as the hottest month on record, and our recent weather has been erratic. Now is the time to take action.  For 20 years, we have been LA water leaders, advocating for a secure local supply. Will you join us now in our efforts to protect LA’s water?Read more >>

How we captured 80k gallons in recent storms!

TreePeople cistern construction Coldwater Canyon Park photo by TreePeople

If you’ve visited our headquarters in Coldwater Canyon Park, you may have noticed a circular grasscrete in front of our Platinum LEED-certified Conference Center. Well, it’s not just decorative. It’s actually the top of a 216,000 gallon cistern that captures rainwater! (In fact, the visible grate marks only a portion of the entire 70’ x 8’ tank!)

What is a cistern?

When it rains, water that hits our Conference Center’s roof is diverted from gutters, as well as runoff from the surrounding parking lot and walkways.Read more >>

LA StormCatcher: You Asked, We Answered


In early November, we debuted our groundbreaking pilot project: LA StormCatcher (#LAStormCatcher). The collaborative brings Los Angeles County and City agencies and community members together to capture stormwater in the face of ongoing drought and a changing climate reality.

Our first pilot site, located in North Hollywood, kicks off a series of renovations designed to show how capturing stormwater at home can increase local water supply, reduce flooding and improve water quality. The project launched with a  press conference that brought a rush of positive buzz and interest, and even had LA’s own Mayor Garcetti and County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl in attendance. Read more >>

5 Great Events to Prepare for El Nino and Planting Season


It’s winter, and not just any winter. We’re expecting an El Niño season with up to 30 inches of rain. With storms on the horizon, is your house prepared to capture stormwater and reduce flooding? Now’s the time to get started!

Join us for these five upcoming events to get ready for the rain! Learn how to install rain barrels before the rains come so you can  capture those precious drops. Or discover how to make your garden the talk of the town by transforming your yard with a colorful, drought-smart native landscape.Read more >>

Prime Time for Rainwater Harvest


Are you considering starting a rainwater harvest project on your property, but not sure where to start? Our FREE workshops are for you! Take it from Sophia, one of our recent workshop attendees!

How did you hear about TreePeople?

When I moved to the Hollywood Hills, I found myself shocked by the user-unfriendly traffic in the region I needed to find sanctuary since the Pacific Ocean and its beaches were no longer accessible. Exploring canyons became my favorite pastime and, because of the convenient TreePeople parking lot on Mulholland, that location is at the top of my hiking-haven list.Read more >>

What is #LAStormCatcher?


Have you heard the news? TreePeople is facilitating a groundbreaking collaboration between our region’s top water agencies, with the help of the engineering firm Tetra Tech, to help fight our Stage 5 drought emergency.

The project includes the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Los Angeles County Flood Control District, and the City’s Bureau of Sanitation working together to show Angelenos how the coming winter rains can be harnessed for water resilience.

The partnership, known as the Greater Los Angeles Water Collaborative, is set to unveil the first pilot site in a series of residential installations that promise to turn Los Angeles’ traditional approach to water upside down.Read more >>