#CoolMyCity: LA’s Urban Cooling Collaborative

LA just increased its coolness factor by $320,000!

On the heels of a sweltering summer, the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council of the U.S. Forest Service awarded the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC), a national partnership led by TreePeople, a $320,000 grant to fund life-saving urban heat research.

The LAUCC is a unique national partnership between nonprofit groups, universities, government agencies and other experts with a goal to create neighborhood-by-neighborhood prescriptions against heat. The Collaborative is developing the most effective dose of trees plus reflective roofs and surfaces in order to save lives and make LA more livable, both today and in tomorrow’s changing climate.Read more >>

200 Volunteers, 57 Trees and a Hopeful Future

“One tree is magic when you have none, two trees are hope when you have one, and three trees are a forest for learning, healing, and dreams.” Rosa Furumoto, Parent Pioneers

Last month, TreePeople, along with our passionate partners at Parent Pioneers, transformed the campus of San Fernando Elementary School. Our team went in and removed 1,284 sq ft of asphalt to make room for 57 new trees to shade the schoolyard and protect kids from rising heat. Over a span of a few weekends, and with the help of 200 dedicated volunteers, the elementary school students now have a safer space to play and learn!Read more >>

LA’s Drought Conundrum

So the drought is over, right?
The short answer is well, maybe.

As the summer season swings into action and temperatures start to rise, it’s the perfect time to remember that as Angelenos, we all have the responsibility to act as stewards for our water and urban trees — even during a record-wet year like this one.

Whether or not we are “in drought” depends not only on the amount of rain we receive but also on temperature — as Peter Gleick, one of the brilliant minds at the Pacific Institute in Oakland has noted.Read more >>

I Am TreePeople: Paola Barcaccia

TreePeople is filled with amazing volunteers, but every so often, one of them shines bright against the crowd. That’s why we’re so grateful to have had the opportunity to sit down with one of our star community members, Paola Baraccia before she left the TreePeople family to move back home to Italy.

What do you do?

I teach Italian since I am originally from Italy for my day job. For fun, I enjoy spending my time outdoors and volunteering here at TreePeople.Read more >>

Reconnect with Nature in Wilson Canyon

After five years of intense drought, LA’s hills are finally alive with a vibrant blanket of lush green grasses and wildflowers!

I love living in LA, but I spend too much time in my car or in air conditioned buildings. But as a volunteer and intern with TreePeople, I get the perfect getaway from city life. I immediately feel my heart calm as I walk along the trails of Coldwater Canyon Park; and life’s stresses, endless to-do lists and work woes slip away when I volunteer in the field.Read more >>

Be Prepared: Eagle Scout Digs In

An Eagle Scout is always prepared– especially in the face of climate change.

Last month, Eagle Scout Wesley Wu worked with me, TreePeople’s Service Learning Manager and Youth Leader Specialist of Environmental Education, and a group of his peers to care for our park.

Enjoli, opening up the morning with the volunteers.

Wesley lead by example using his Eagle Scout training to rally over 40 students from six different schools across LA County to support one of our city’s most valuable resources– our trees.Read more >>

Growing “Calles Verdes”: Restoring the Pacoima Wash

Nothing inspires me more than seeing people come together to make change.

Over the past couple months, TreePeople has worked to restore the Pacoima Wash with the help of our volunteers and the City of San Fernando. When we started, the area was overgrown with weeds and littered with trash, but after just a couple visits it already looks like it’s gotten the green treatment!

Did you know that the Pacoima Wash Greenway is also nature-based infrastructure? The 4.7-acre park diverts and cleans runoff from nearby neighborhood streets through a system of built and natural filters into a streambed or “arroyo.” Our recent winter rains has sprung the wash into action to capture and sink rain into the ground.Read more >>