Drought Conference Call: Learn from TreePeople’s Founder and President Andy Lipkis

Dying trees 5

Without water there are no trees, and without trees there is no water.

So long as this record-breaking drought persists, Southern California’s quality and way of life remain threatened. TreePeople is on the front lines working with government agencies and utilities to produce a coordinated response to our water crisis so that we keep our tree canopy and radically conserve the water we use. But we can’t do it alone.

Please join us for a conference call with TreePeople’s Founder and President Andy Lipkis on either Thursday, February 20 at 8:00 pm OR Saturday, February 22 at 10:00 am to learn what TreePeople is organizing and what you can do.… Read more >>

California Drought: Survive and Thrive with TreePeople Solutions


Part of our mission here at TreePeople is to be a source of practical information and solutions that can help keep every Angeleno safe and healthy, especially in times of extreme weather and natural forces such as the current drought emergency. Even in the face of projected hotter and more erratic weather patterns, we can still move the city towards a viable future – together.

The answer lies in taking care of our most vital resource for environmental well-being in urban areas: trees.… Read more >>

Enough For Us All! (But We Have To Do Our Part)


“We have enough water to live on, but not enough to waste.” — Dorothy Green, founding president of Heal the Bay.

Dorothy Green wrote these words in an article that was published in the Los Angeles Times in 2008, shortly before her death. She went on to outline a thoughtful set of recommendations to create a sustainable water supply for Southern California.

So it is disheartening to see a Times article appear six years later that practically suggests that, despite this being the driest year in recorded history, everything’s fine.… Read more >>

Not Enough Water, L.A.? Look Up.

I am excited to announce that today’s edition of the Los Angeles Times carries a timely Op-Ed that I wrote titled, “Not enough water, L.A.? Look up.

Did Mulholland Get it Wrong?

Nearly one hundred years ago today, William Mulholland stood before a crowd of 40,000 near San Fernando and unfurled an American flag, signaling the official opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. As water from the Owens Valley rushed through the spillway for the first time, Mulholland exulted to the assembled onlookers, “There it is.… Read more >>

Forbes Features TreePeople’s Water Work

Sun Valley Watershed Plan

Our “sound bite” name of TreePeople is misleading. What we do goes way beyond trees. A recent article in Forbes describes the deeper side of our work, which is about building Los Angeles’ next water supply.

Trees are inextricably linked to water—capturing, cleansing and storing rainwater and protecting us from drought and floods. As such, they are an essential part of our city’s infrastructure. Not the built, costly, man-made “gray” infrastructure, but infrastructure that is green and living.

Read on (and catch our short video!) to see how investing in local water through investing in trees and other green infrastructure can grow our local economy.… Read more >>

Words of Praise from a Conservation Leader


At TreePeople we’re all about partnerships. From the U.S. Forest Service to the Mountains Restoration Trust to the Social Justice Learning Institute to city and county government agencies, professionals and organizations give us reasons every day to stand in awe of the individuals and groups willing to work together toward improving the health of our trees and local environment.

When those we admire laud us in return, it always gives us a boost! Meet Rosi Dagit, a well-known biologist and certified arborist with the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains. … Read more >>

TreePeople’s Ecological Restoration Team to the Rescue

Forty-five-acre Coldwater Canyon Park is home to TreePeople’s hilltop headquarters and the state-of-the-art Center for Community Forestry. Known to locals as a great hiking and dog-walking area, it’s one of the city’s valuable open spaces, and therefore home also to a myriad species of native plants and animals. As in other urban parks, though, its ecosystem is fragile and needs to be maintained.

TreePeople restores the park grounds with the help of a trained volunteer Ecological Restoration Team (ERT) that has evolved out of earlier teams of Americorps volunteers.… Read more >>