NEW: Research from Australia to Create a Water-Secure LA


What I witnessed in Australia truly shifted my thinking. Once I returned home, I found myself waking up in the middle of the night, thinking about how to transform LA to capture and conserve water.

-study trip delegate Councilmember Felipe Fuentes

TreePeople is proud to announce the release of our new report, Transferring Lessons from Australia’s Millennium Drought to California.

California and Australia share many climatic, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics that lend themselves to meaningful exchanges of knowledge and innovations.Read more >>

Join Our Twitter Party to Celebrate #WorldWaterDay


Between 1997 to 2010, Australia experienced the devastating “Millennium Drought,” a period that brought the region’s longest stretch of drought on record. Four years in, their drought was similar to California’s current experience: overwhelming and destructive.

To learn from Australia’s experience, TreePeople has been leading the way in research to adopt drought solutions locally. In 2014, TreePeople and The Energy Coalition co-organized a delegation of policymakers and elected officials to some of Australia’s most innovative cities to learn from their drought solutions.Read more >>

Celebrate Urban Trees as Superheroes on National Arbor Day, April 26


U.S. Forest Service researchers have published compelling evidence* of urban trees’ immense carbon storage capacity. Along with the other many things they do to improve the environment, trees absorb carbon dioxide emissions from a multitude of pollution sources in our cities. “Thus,” the researchers conclude, “urban trees influence local climate, carbon cycles, energy use, and climate change.”

National Arbor Day is April 26. We join our friends at Alliance for Community Trees in the firm belief that reducing atmospheric CO2 is one of the most important functions of the urban forest—and that people can play a big role.… Read more >>

Planting Fruit Trees in Food Deserts


The USDA Economic Research Service publishes the Food Environment Atlas to document, county by county throughout the United States, the percentage of households with limited access to grocery stores—and therefore to adequate nutrition. The interactive map aims to provide a spatial overview of communities’ abilities to access healthy food, but, so far, it doesn’t allow users to drill down to the level of neighborhoods.

In Los Angeles County, known “food deserts” include areas of South L.A. and the Northeast San Fernando Valley.… Read more >>