I Am TreePeople: Janie Thompson

Without the hard work of community, we couldn’t do what we do. This month, we’re spotlighting a volunteer whose love of trees lead her to water. Meet Janie Thompson, TreePeople Citizen Arborist and advocate for water conservation, whose home has been called a model of water conservation practices by LA Councilmember Paul Koretz and the LADWP.

When Janie moved to LA in the 1980s, she was amazed at the variety of plants and trees that would grow here. “Had I been given that knowledge [which plants are climate-appropriate] that would have been so valuable,” she says now, but back then she planted on her Encino property without much regard for the local climate.… Read more >>

On the Horizon: Collaborative Solutions to LA’s Water Crises

TreePeople Releases Two Promising New Reports

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This historic drought is driving a thirst for solutions, and government agencies are responding with an openness to work together as never before. Over the past year, TreePeople has facilitated an exciting exploration of “collaborative governance” among agencies for innovative water management in the Los Angeles region. Our partners in this effort are the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works.… Read more >>

How This LA Couple Replaced Their Lawn with Drought Tolerant Plants & Mulch

Husband and wife Mark Rinaldi and Debbie Imsland have long been interested in sustainability. At home, they were conscientious about conserving water, taking care not to water the lawn too often or stay in the shower too long.

But it wasn’t until Debbie attended one of our Rainwater Harvesting Workshops that they considered making some major changes to their Gardena home. It started when they installed rain barrels in their yard, but it wasn’t long until they turned to their lawn.… Read more >>

5 Great Reasons to Vote for TreeMapLA

We’ve got one last day before voting for LA2050’s grants closes, and we need your help to boost us up to the lead! Here are some great reasons to vote for TreeMapLA:

Reason #1:

A well-populated map can help us find our way to a greener, healthier, more sustainable Los Angeles.

 

Reason #2:

With TreeMapLA’s help, we can map and increase the watershed solutions in LA to make sure that when it rains, the water doesn’t go to waste.

 

Reason #3:

Mapping trees gives you the chance to give your trees some love.… Read more >>

TreePeople Needs YOUR Vote for a More Livable Future!

Recently, LA2050 asked a provocative question: how would YOU use $100,000 to make Los Angeles the healthiest place to live?

It’s a great question, and we have our answer: TreeMapLA. By continuing to build TreeMapLA as a simple, powerful, and user-friendly tool, we will enable residents of Los Angeles County to use the map to become more aware of LA’s urban ecosystem. TreeMapLA will help Angelenos plant and care for the millions of trees and rainwater catchment systems we need to make the city healthier and more sustainable.… Read more >>

Water For Us All!

“We have enough water to live on, but not enough to waste.” — Dorothy Green, founding president of Heal the Bay.

Dorothy Green wrote these words in an article that was published in the LA Times in 2008, shortly before her death. In it, she outlines an incredibly thoughtful set of recommendations that would create a sustainable water supply.

So it’s disheartening to see people acting in such a way that suggests we aren’t currently in the midst of the driest year in recorded history.… Read more >>

TreePeople’s Policy Work: Transforming LA into a Climate- and Water-Resilient City

Each week, TreePeople is out in the neighborhoods and surrounding mountains of Los Angeles, planting and caring for trees and native plants to ensure that our city has a growing, thriving urban ecosystem. But that’s not all we do – every day, we’re also working with agencies and policymakers at the city, county, state, and federal levels to enact strong policies to support creating a 21st century infrastructure for a water-resilient LA.

As Deborah Weinstein Bloome, TreePeople’s Director of Policy, explains, policy work “has been part of our DNA from the beginning,” largely under the guidance of our founder and president, Andy Lipkis.… Read more >>

How to Kill Your Lawn

Now that we’re in the depths of the drought, LADWP is offering $3 per square foot for turf replacement. Since some 50% of our water goes to landscaping, ripping out your lawn is one of the best ways you can conserve water.

How do you go about killing your lawn? Well, the easiest and best way to reduce your turf is sheet mulching. With sheet mulching, your yard can go from a water-thirsty, outdated green shag carpet to a sustainable garden with about as much effort as it takes to mow the lawn.… Read more >>

AB 2403 Sets the Stage for Stormwater Capture

Before and after the Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit, which reconfigured neighborhood infrastructure to increase stormwater filtration and capture.

It doesn’t rain much in Los Angeles, but it does rain: in an average year, enough rain falls throughout Los Angeles County to supply 650,000 families with enough water to live off if we captured it. For this reason, for more than twenty years TreePeople has been championing rainwater harvesting as a key part of our water supply. On June 28th, it became an even more economically and politically viable solution, as Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 2403 into law.… Read more >>

Transforming Upstream Landscapes for a Healthy LA River

At the end of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to recommend approval for a $1 billion proposal to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River. According to the Los Angeles Times, the plan, which is supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti and a number of elected officials and advocacy groups – TreePeople included – “will restore habitat, widen the river, create wetlands, and provide access points and bike trails” along a portion of the river that runs north of downtown, through Elysian Park.… Read more >>