Everyone has a Tree Story

“Everyone has a tree story.”

Chris Imhoff, our Director of Program Development, would know, as she’s been working with TreePeople since 1979. They say when you work in nonprofit, you wear a lot of hats. In Yurt Village, we like to say that Chris has worn them all.

Chris Imhoff sitting on the ground in the center with some of the original TreePeople staff.

Chris began with TreePeople as an Intern on our Environmental Education team. Since then, she has been a program manager, an executive assistant, a program co-director– and most importantly, a mentor to nearly everyone.  Read more >>

First Look: 300 Free Fruit Trees Planted for San Fernando

If there’s one thing Angelenos can agree on, it’s that we have a special place in our hearts for fruit trees.

From classic citrus, savory stone fruit, or (the millennial favorite) avocado, our city is blessed to have these trees thrive and bloom all year long. So it’s no surprise that there was no shortage of excitement from eager residents during our latest free Fruit Tree Distribution at San Fernando’s Pacoima Wash Natural Park earlier this month.

LA’s Northeast San Fernando Valley is a “food desert”– or an area where a high percentage of households have limited access to grocery stores with healthy, nutritious foods.Read more >>

LA Psychiatrist Prescribes A Walk Among His 120 Trees

Trees and people are inextricably linked, and our mutual relationship has the power to heal and create change. Meet a local Angeleno who walks this talk.

Dr. David May, a psychiatrist and TreePeople neighbor, has been busy linking trees and people since he first happened upon our nursery and met our resident Arborist Linda Eremita in 1998. Since then, he’s gone on to plant over 120 trees, many of them sourced directly from our nursery (which at the time grew trees for the public).… Read more >>

Planting Fruit Trees in Food Deserts

The USDA Economic Research Service publishes the Food Environment Atlas to document, county by county throughout the United States, the percentage of households with limited access to grocery stores—and therefore to adequate nutrition. The interactive map aims to provide a spatial overview of communities’ abilities to access healthy food, but, so far, it doesn’t allow users to drill down to the level of neighborhoods.

In Los Angeles County, known “food deserts” include areas of South L.A. and the Northeast San Fernando Valley.… Read more >>

Grow a Food Forest in a Food Desert

Fruit Tree load-up, photo: Amanda Keller Konya

The term “food desert” describes an urban community that lacks access to fresh, healthy food in local shops and grocery stores. These are regions in our city where, for various reasons, neighborhood retailers can’t or don’t stock produce and healthful alternatives to processed fast food.

In Inglewood’s “100 Seeds of Change” initiative, residents have taken health matters into their own hands, growing fruits and vegetables themselves—and in temperate Los Angeles, they can turn even a small patch of earth into a food forest.… Read more >>