4 Ways To Care for LA Trees This Earth Month


Happy Earth Month, fellow tree people!

A greener LA is always on our mind, but this month especially we’re thinking about the love we give to our urban forest. Climate change and a record drought mean that trees are stressed, and keeping LA green and sustainable is more important than ever. We rely on volunteers to help us transform our region into a healthy urban ecosystem, and there’s no time like the present to start doing your part!

Here are all the ways you can help out this month.… Read more >>

Make No Mistake: Concrete is the Enemy

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Statement from Andy Lipkis, Founder and President of TreePeople, calls on Angelenos to rip out concrete and plant trees to capture what rainfall LA gets.

LOS ANGELES, Calif.– TreePeople heard fighting words when news reports showed an anti-tree group calling themselves “Save Our Concrete” holding a protest at a downtown Los Angeles parking lot earlier today.

The truth is that concrete is the enemy of Los Angeles. It is the enemy because, among other reasons, as LA suffers through historic drought, concrete takes away our water.… Read more >>

Trees In the City Make Us Safer, Happier, and Healthier

Trees are often touted for providing shade, cleaning our air and capturing the rain, but did you know trees also are living anti-depressants?

Recent studies show that trees make city-dwellers happier, healthier and more connected to their communities. Just a few of the reasons you should hug a tree today.


The Mind-Body-Tree Connection 

Now that more than half the world’s population experiences the stress related to modern city life, urban green spaces are more important than ever for our collective and emotional well being.… Read more >>

7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest


Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>

I Am TreePeople: Tim Douglass


“Some of these trees that l’m planting today I may not see in my lifetime, but I know that my kids’ kids could sit under one of these trees.”

TreePeople has a legacy of inspiring activism, but it’s the stories of our volunteers that inspire us to keep coming together to build a sustainable future.

Meet Tim Douglass, a TreePeople volunteer and Mountain Forestry Supervisor.


“We only have one environment and we have a responsibility to take care of it.”

Tim got involved with TreePeople after the Angeles Forest “Station Fire” of 2009.… Read more >>

5 Great Reasons to Vote for TreeMapLA

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We’ve got one last day before voting for LA2050’s grants closes, and we need your help to boost us up to the lead! Here are some great reasons to vote for TreeMapLA:

Reason #1:

A well-populated map can help us find our way to a greener, healthier, more sustainable Los Angeles.


Reason #2:

With TreeMapLA’s help, we can map and increase the watershed solutions in LA to make sure that when it rains, the water doesn’t go to waste.


Reason #3:

Mapping trees gives you the chance to give your trees some love.… Read more >>

ForestAid Helps Angeles National Forest Survive the Drought


At 18 events throughout the spring of 2013, more than a thousand volunteers planted nearly 10,000 seedlings in the Angeles National Forest, all around the Chilao campground.

It was all part of the ForestAid: Angeles program, a joint effort of the Forest Service and TreePeople to lead reforestation efforts after the 2009 Station Fire that burned down 400 acres of forest.

After the trees were planted, we worked through the summer to care for these young trees and help them get through a very hot and long summer.… Read more >>