10 Native Plants To Up Your Home’s Sustainability

Certified Arborist Linda Eremita

Certified Arborist Linda Eremita

 It’s planting season! Is your green thumb itching? If your landscaping could use  a drought-smart update, now’s a great time to put new roots in the  ground. Our  Certified  Arborist Linda Eremita shares her favorite native, drought-tolerant,  and sun loving  plants, each of which is resilient  in LA’s hot, dry summers.


Saint Catherine‘s Lace

Eriogonum giganteum

The big pinkish-white, flat-topped flowers of this native California buckwheat appear in late spring and through summer before fading to red-brown.… Read more >>

TreePeople Statement On Governor Jerry Brown’s Executive Order Setting Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets

© Max Whittaker/European Pressphoto Agency


LOS ANGELES, Calif.— Today Governor Jerry Brown signed an Executive Order calling for a greenhouse gas emissions target of 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. TreePeople applauds this move as it makes way for California to stay on track to reach its goal of reducing emissions to be 80% under 1990 levels by 2050, and to more aggressively address and mitigate the effects of climate change already impacting our communities, natural resources and public health.… Read more >>

LA Psychiatrist Prescribes A Walk Among His 120 Trees


Trees and people are inextricably linked, and our mutual relationship has the power to heal and create change. Meet a local Angeleno who walks this talk.

Dr. David May, a psychiatrist and TreePeople neighbor, has been busy linking trees and people since he first happened upon our nursery and met our resident Arborist Linda Eremita in 1998. Since then, he’s gone on to plant over 120 trees, many of them sourced directly from our nursery (which at the time grew trees for the public).… Read more >>

4 Ways To Care for LA Trees This Earth Month


Happy Earth Month, fellow tree people!

A greener LA is always on our mind, but this month especially we’re thinking about the love we give to our urban forest. Climate change and a record drought mean that trees are stressed, and keeping LA green and sustainable is more important than ever. We rely on volunteers to help us transform our region into a healthy urban ecosystem, and there’s no time like the present to start doing your part!

Here are all the ways you can help out this month.… Read more >>

Make No Mistake: Concrete is the Enemy

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Statement from Andy Lipkis, Founder and President of TreePeople, calls on Angelenos to rip out concrete and plant trees to capture what rainfall LA gets.

LOS ANGELES, Calif.– TreePeople heard fighting words when news reports showed an anti-tree group calling themselves “Save Our Concrete” holding a protest at a downtown Los Angeles parking lot earlier today.

The truth is that concrete is the enemy of Los Angeles. It is the enemy because, among other reasons, as LA suffers through historic drought, concrete takes away our water.… Read more >>

Trees In the City Make Us Safer, Happier, and Healthier

Trees are often touted for providing shade, cleaning our air and capturing the rain, but did you know trees also are living anti-depressants?

Recent studies show that trees make city-dwellers happier, healthier and more connected to their communities. Just a few of the reasons you should hug a tree today.


The Mind-Body-Tree Connection 

Now that more than half the world’s population experiences the stress related to modern city life, urban green spaces are more important than ever for our collective and emotional well being.… Read more >>

7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest


Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>