TreePeople Fellows Strive to Save Urban Forests

TreePeople is blessed with an array of amazing minds that come through Yurt Village, and this past summer, we had two bright young minds join our Policy & Research Department.

Erik Ndayishimiye and Matthew Stieg were brought on at the beginning of the summer through our fellowship program to work on issues surrounding LA’s urban forest. Both put their talent to work to help support our team offering their unique skills and backgrounds.

Erik hails from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies with a newly completed Master’s Degree in Environmental Management while Matthew is about to finish his senior year at the University of Michigan where he studies Mathematics and Statistics.Read more >>

Climate Conversations for Beginners

Massive wildfires engulfing the west coast and extreme hurricanes bludgeoning our neighbors in the east have left a lot us scared and wondering ‘Is this the future of our climate?’

Media doesn’t always help either. Alarming reports and frightening statistics can sometimes make you feel like all you can do is curl up in a corner and watch while Mother Earth gets her revenge for the abuse she’s endured.

We’re here to tell you that this is a completely normal way to feel.Read more >>

#CoolMyCity: LA’s Urban Cooling Collaborative

LA just increased its coolness factor by $320,000!

On the heels of a sweltering summer, the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council of the U.S. Forest Service awarded the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC), a national partnership led by TreePeople, a $320,000 grant to fund life-saving urban heat research.

The LAUCC is a unique national partnership between nonprofit groups, universities, government agencies and other experts with a goal to create neighborhood-by-neighborhood prescriptions against heat. The Collaborative is developing the most effective dose of trees plus reflective roofs and surfaces in order to save lives and make LA more livable, both today and in tomorrow’s changing climate.Read more >>

6 Ways to Be Cool and Stay Cool this Summer

Many people assume that LA is a desert— it’s not. Actually, we are one of the few places on Earth that enjoy a Mediterranean climate. That’s one of the reasons we all love living here. Regions like ours enjoy mild winters and warm summers. But you may have noticed that summers are feeling extra hot lately!

With the ever-increasing threat of climate change, extreme heat is in our future. Even with the rains we saw over the winter, we still face unprecedented times.Read more >>

200 Volunteers, 57 Trees and a Hopeful Future

“One tree is magic when you have none, two trees are hope when you have one, and three trees are a forest for learning, healing, and dreams.” Rosa Furumoto, Parent Pioneers

Last month, TreePeople, along with our passionate partners at Parent Pioneers, transformed the campus of San Fernando Elementary School. Our team went in and removed 1,284 sq ft of asphalt to make room for 57 new trees to shade the schoolyard and protect kids from rising heat. Over a span of a few weekends, and with the help of 200 dedicated volunteers, the elementary school students now have a safer space to play and learn!Read more >>

LA’s Drought Conundrum

So the drought is over, right?
The short answer is well, maybe.

As the summer season swings into action and temperatures start to rise, it’s the perfect time to remember that as Angelenos, we all have the responsibility to act as stewards for our water and urban trees — even during a record-wet year like this one.

Whether or not we are “in drought” depends not only on the amount of rain we receive but also on temperature — as Peter Gleick, one of the brilliant minds at the Pacific Institute in Oakland has noted.Read more >>

Combating the Drought: Channeling the Flood

The intense winter rains of 2016-2017 may mean relief from the drought for Northern California, but here in Southern California we’re not out of the woods yet.

Our new climate reality promises one thing: weather extremes. Our water supplies are unpredictable for us and our trees. Years of drought that kill off our trees by the thousands and parch the earth will be followed by times of intense flooding, like we are experiencing now.

We must prepare TODAY for the “feast or famine” of our water future.Read more >>