#LAStormCatcher: Hope for LA’s Water Future


California is in the grips of a fifth year of drought, impacting our region’s water security.

However, Los Angeles County communities can achieve a climate-resilient future and adapt to the impacts of ongoing heat, drought and pollution. It’s not just something that TreePeople believes– it’s something we’re actively working toward in partnership with our region’s largest water agencies.


We want to create an entirely new system from one home at a time throughout all the cities in the County by reusing, recycling or recharging.


Check out these Inspiring Water-Wise Students!


We are so impressed! Congratulations to all the schools that participated in the Streets to the Sea Challenge!  The Challenge recognizes students who organize service-learning projects around stormwater pollution prevention and water-wise solutions.

This year, 11 schools from around Los Angeles County were selected for the final round of judging held at Disney Synergy Lab, one of their Burbank animation studios. The competition offered one middle school and one high school a chance to win a trip to the Floating Lab, a boat adventure filled with marine science fun.  Read more >>

Speak Up for LA’s Water Future


El Niño isn’t panning out to be the drought buster we had hoped.

Despite the recent rain, scientists believe prolonged drought is in California’s future. We shouldn’t be surprised. The links between climate change and extreme weather patterns are undeniable. Weather satellites marked February as the hottest month on record, and our recent weather has been erratic. Now is the time to take action.  For 20 years, we have been LA water leaders, advocating for a secure local supply. Will you join us now in our efforts to protect LA’s water?Read more >>

LA StormCatcher: You Asked, We Answered


In early November, we debuted our groundbreaking pilot project: LA StormCatcher (#LAStormCatcher). The collaborative brings Los Angeles County and City agencies and community members together to capture stormwater in the face of ongoing drought and a changing climate reality.

Our first pilot site, located in North Hollywood, kicks off a series of renovations designed to show how capturing stormwater at home can increase local water supply, reduce flooding and improve water quality. The project launched with a  press conference that brought a rush of positive buzz and interest, and even had LA’s own Mayor Garcetti and County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl in attendance. Read more >>

What Do UCLA, Trout and El Nino Have in Common?

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Each year we look forward to late September, when we rally a hearty group of volunteers to celebrate National Park Lands Day. The day was established to unite people from all over the country to promote the protection of public lands.

Compassionate volunteers painstakingly removed snails before dumping this couch.

Compassionate volunteers painstakingly removed snails before dumping this couch.

Here at TreePeople, we were excited to be one of over 2,500 sites in participation—with a focus on our restoration of the Santa Monica Mountains. Initially, our Wildlands Restoration Manager, Cody Chappel, had planned to coordinate 70 volunteers to remove abandoned junk—couches, appliances, fencing, and more!—left behind by squatters, decades ago near Topanga Canyon.… Read more >>

Mayor Garcetti Joins TreePeople Gala


This weekend we were joined by 400 of our biggest supporters and LA Mayor Eric Garcetti for our 28th annual fundraising gala, An Evening Under the Harvest Moon.


This year’s program focused on California’s ongoing drought and our commitment to create a water-secure Los Angeles.  Mayor Garcetti’s keynote speech inspired us all, as he spoke of the critical nature of our work and pushed us to continue moving toward higher conservation goals. (Fun fact: He’s been involved with TreePeople since he was a teen!)


TreePeople’s Park Also Suffering From Drought


This is—well, was—Elvis Presleaf, one of the oldest trees here in our park. After 80 years of life, Mr. Presleaf was just one of 18813838585_3399f1ee67_kdozens of trees in our park which have succumb to the debilitating drought.

Elvis played an important role in our Eco-tours. Over the past 20 years, he shaded nearly 200,000 visiting students at the Dirt Doctor Station, where kids learn the importance of soil.

It’s easy to forget how severely trees are affected by drought. After all, LA yards look pretty green.… Read more >>