On the Horizon: Collaborative Solutions to LA’s Water Crises


TreePeople Releases Two Promising New Reports

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This historic drought is driving a thirst for solutions, and government agencies are responding with an openness to work together as never before. Over the past year, TreePeople has facilitated an exciting exploration of “collaborative governance” among agencies for innovative water management in the Los Angeles region. Our partners in this effort are the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works.… Read more >>

5 Reasons We Can’t Live Without Soil


We love to sing the praises of our friends the trees, but we often forget about the critical resource right under our feet: the soil. Trees and other plants need healthy soil to thrive, but the scope of soil benefits go beyond planting.

Soil influences the life spans of our roads and highways. Healthy soil is the foundation for food, animal feed and fuel. Lumber, bricks and textiles all come from soil. Even important discoveries in the field of medicine can be linked to soil. … Read more >>

Students: Invent A Stormwater Pollution Hack for a Chance to Visit the Long Beach Floating Labs!

Santa Monica Beach

TreePeople’s Generation Earth program challenges students to show LA County how we can alleviate the effects of stormwater pollution in our community! Students must invent or discover a stormwater pollution prevention hack (an easily accessible and affordable solution) to keep clean, help conserve, or recycle water, and then share the hack with their school.


Urban runoff is the single highest source of water pollution. Photo by Mahgum Asgarian.

Urban stormwater runoff is the single highest source of water pollution. Photo by Mahgum Asgarian.


Sign Up   Form a Challenge Team with at least five student leaders, an adult supervisor and be sure to email Generation Earth at emurphy@treepeople.org to receive your application packet.… Read more >>

7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest


Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>

Transforming Upstream Landscapes for a Healthy LA River


At the end of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to recommend approval for a $1 billion proposal to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River. According to the Los Angeles Times, the plan, which is supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti and a number of elected officials and advocacy groups – TreePeople included – “will restore habitat, widen the river, create wetlands, and provide access points and bike trails” along a portion of the river that runs north of downtown, through Elysian Park.… Read more >>

Not Enough Water, L.A.? Look Up.

I am excited to announce that today’s edition of the Los Angeles Times carries a timely Op-Ed that I wrote titled, “Not enough water, L.A.? Look up.

Did Mulholland Get it Wrong?

Nearly one hundred years ago today, William Mulholland stood before a crowd of 40,000 near San Fernando and unfurled an American flag, signaling the official opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. As water from the Owens Valley rushed through the spillway for the first time, Mulholland exulted to the assembled onlookers, “There it is.… Read more >>

Learning from Australia’s Drought: TreePeople Draws Lessons From Down Under

Rainwater Plumbed Indoors - Melbourne Water

In 2012, TreePeople began an exchange between government, research and community organizations in Australia and Southern California. The aim of the program: to share innovations, best practices and experience in urban rainwater capture, water conservation practices and drought response—topics that are increasingly relevant as the climate of the American Southwest (and beyond) changes for the drier.

Why Australia?

Australia experienced several devastatingly dry episodes in the last 100 years. The most recent—called the “Millennium Drought”—started in 1997 and continued through 2010, and brought the country’s longest period of rainfall shortage on record.… Read more >>