How Does 4 + 7 = 180 Trees?


Amidst historic drought, many of our city trees have been left thirsty. Without thriving trees, residents suffer from more extreme heat, increased air pollution and serious health implications.

Because of this, TreePeople has stepped up to care for our urban forest. For instance, this summer we hosted a series of four tree care events in the Northeast Valley—inviting nearly 200 volunteers to care for seven miles of trees! Our work began near the Hansen Dam Golf Course in Pacoima, and continued well into Sun Valley.… Read more >>

Fight Drought. Volunteer in LA!


All across LA, people are coming together to do their part to save water—taking shorter showers, replacing turf with native plants, and installing rain barrels. These are all great ways to save the drop and fight drought.

If you’re looking to take the next step, why not volunteer with TreePeople? Our city’s trees are thirsty and need your help. Each weekend we have opportunities for you to learn about our local ecology, connect with like-minded Angelenos and help make Los Angeles a climate-resilient city.… Read more >>

I Am Tree People: Peter Roquemore


Meet Peter Roquemore, our new Volunteer Manager.

“It’s serendipitous!” Peter said, showing off his wrist tattoo. It reads “Unless,” in homage to the famous line in Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

Peter has always had an interest in the environment. But it was during his college years when he spent time near the coal fields in West Pennsylvania that he first realized the importance of conservation to protect the most vulnerable communities.… Read more >>

I Am Tree People: Art Salter


If you saw Art Salter at TreePeople’s Yurt Village, you might assume he was a celebrity. Not a minute passed without someone stopping to shake his hand, or wave from across the offices. It was clear that he has made a significant impact on his city.

It makes sense: Art has been volunteering here for nearly 18 years—but that isn’t where things began. No, Art has always been involved in developing a climate-resilient Los Angeles. “I grew up here,” he said.… Read more >>

How Can Just 100,000 Trees Save LA Nearly $4 Million?


Have you heard of TreeMapLA?

If you’re unfamiliar, TreeMapLA is an app you can download that’s a public inventory and education tool allowing users to interact with their environment in a new way. Users “map” a tree by entering its location, species, and size to create an interactive map of our urban forest and its value—including environmental and economic benefits. The app also gives people the ability to map a variety of watershed solutions, including rain barrels and cisterns.


When it launched, TreeMapLA relied on Angelenos’ involvement, but now there have been huge inventories uploaded from Culver City, Pico Rivera, Duarte and LA City Rec and Parks thanks to a new feature developers created to add mass data inventories.… Read more >>

Trees In the City Make Us Safer, Happier, and Healthier

Trees are often touted for providing shade, cleaning our air and capturing the rain, but did you know trees also are living anti-depressants?

Recent studies show that trees make city-dwellers happier, healthier and more connected to their communities. Just a few of the reasons you should hug a tree today.


The Mind-Body-Tree Connection 

Now that more than half the world’s population experiences the stress related to modern city life, urban green spaces are more important than ever for our collective and emotional well being.… Read more >>

Thirsty Thursday Quenches the Drought AND Your Thirst

featured photo

“Trees need people, people need trees” – if you’ve ever worked with TreePeople, you know the rhythmic lilt of that chant as well as you know the story of the 15-year-old boy who tore up a parking lot with his bare hands to plant a grove of trees (so the legend goes) and started the whole thing in motion 40 years ago.

But after 40 years, it’s about time for a mid-life crisis and with the historic drought of the past few years leaving our urban forest thirsting for water, it was only a matter of time before somebody teased the following transitive relation out of the classic TreePeople chant: “Trees need people, people need beers, therefore, trees need beers.” And with that simple idea, scrawled almost illegibly onto a cocktail napkin (so the legend goes), a revolution began and Thirsty Thursday was born.… Read more >>