How Does 4 + 7 = 180 Trees?


Amidst historic drought, many of our city trees have been left thirsty. Without thriving trees, residents suffer from more extreme heat, increased air pollution and serious health implications.

Because of this, TreePeople has stepped up to care for our urban forest. For instance, this summer we hosted a series of four tree care events in the Northeast Valley—inviting nearly 200 volunteers to care for seven miles of trees! Our work began near the Hansen Dam Golf Course in Pacoima, and continued well into Sun Valley.… Read more >>

Fight Drought. Volunteer in LA!


All across LA, people are coming together to do their part to save water—taking shorter showers, replacing turf with native plants, and installing rain barrels. These are all great ways to save the drop and fight drought.

If you’re looking to take the next step, why not volunteer with TreePeople? Our city’s trees are thirsty and need your help. Each weekend we have opportunities for you to learn about our local ecology, connect with like-minded Angelenos and help make Los Angeles a climate-resilient city.… Read more >>

I Am Tree People: Art Salter


If you saw Art Salter at TreePeople’s Yurt Village, you might assume he was a celebrity. Not a minute passed without someone stopping to shake his hand, or wave from across the offices. It was clear that he has made a significant impact on his city.

It makes sense: Art has been volunteering here for nearly 18 years—but that isn’t where things began. No, Art has always been involved in developing a climate-resilient Los Angeles. “I grew up here,” he said.… Read more >>

How Can Just 100,000 Trees Save LA Nearly $4 Million?


Have you heard of TreeMapLA?

If you’re unfamiliar, TreeMapLA is an app you can download that’s a public inventory and education tool allowing users to interact with their environment in a new way. Users “map” a tree by entering its location, species, and size to create an interactive map of our urban forest and its value—including environmental and economic benefits. The app also gives people the ability to map a variety of watershed solutions, including rain barrels and cisterns.


When it launched, TreeMapLA relied on Angelenos’ involvement, but now there have been huge inventories uploaded from Culver City, Pico Rivera, Duarte and LA City Rec and Parks thanks to a new feature developers created to add mass data inventories.… Read more >>

Integrated Water Management: A Framework for Collaborative Governance


Increasing Agency Collaboration for a Better Water Future

For the past two decades, TreePeople has been advocating for Los Angeles’ watersheds to be managed in a more integrated way. Our recent report, Moving Towards Collaboration: A New Vision for Water Management, lays out a path to achieve this and overcome common barriers to implementation.

After researching examples of integrated management from around the world, we developed a framework, focused on stormwater, as a resource for agencies and other leaders to consider future approaches that could positively impact their organizations and work.… Read more >>

7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest


Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>

TreePeople Needs YOUR Vote for a More Livable Future!

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Recently, LA2050 asked a provocative question: how would YOU use $100,000 to make Los Angeles the healthiest place to live?

It’s a great question, and we have our answer: TreeMapLA. By continuing to build TreeMapLA as a simple, powerful, and user-friendly tool, we will enable residents of Los Angeles County to use the map to become more aware of LA’s urban ecosystem. TreeMapLA will help Angelenos plant and care for the millions of trees and rainwater catchment systems we need to make the city healthier and more sustainable.… Read more >>