Media Round Up: #LAStormCatcher      


Yesterday TreePeople held a press conference with our agency partners, Mayor Garcetti, Supervisor Kuehl and Councilmember Krekorian to unveil the #LAStormCatcher pilot-to-scale project. The project brings together agencies and Southern California residents to capture the rain at scale in the face of ongoing drought and a predicted severe El Niño winter.

The first pilot site, debuted yesterday in North Hollywood, is the first in a series of home retrofits that plans to change our relationship with water while also helping to increase local water supply, prevent flooding and improve water quality.… Read more >>

What is #LAStormCatcher?


Have you heard the news? TreePeople is facilitating a groundbreaking collaboration between our region’s top water agencies, with the help of the engineering firm Tetra Tech, to help fight our Stage 5 drought emergency.

The project includes the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Los Angeles County Flood Control District, and the City’s Bureau of Sanitation working together to show Angelenos how the coming winter rains can be harnessed for water resilience.

The partnership, known as the Greater Los Angeles Water Collaborative, is set to unveil the first pilot site in a series of residential installations that promise to turn Los Angeles’ traditional approach to water upside down.Read more >>

KCET SoCal Connected: Capturing Rainwater One Rain Barrel at a Time

KCET SoCal Connected Interviews TreePeople's Andy Lipkis

Last month during the height of the scant LA rainfall, KCET SoCal Connected’s Val Zavala interviewed our Founder and President, Andy Lipkis on the importance of capturing every drop that falls to wean our city off imported water and strengthen our local water supply.

 Read on for the full story and be sure to watch his interview with Zavala.

You can bet that it doesn’t rain cats and dogs here in Southern California. But that’s no excuse not to prepare and capture the rain that does fall.… Read more >>

Transforming Upstream Landscapes for a Healthy LA River


At the end of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to recommend approval for a $1 billion proposal to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River. According to the Los Angeles Times, the plan, which is supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti and a number of elected officials and advocacy groups – TreePeople included – “will restore habitat, widen the river, create wetlands, and provide access points and bike trails” along a portion of the river that runs north of downtown, through Elysian Park.… Read more >>

Parking Lot Cool


In these recent unseasonably hot days, have you noticed the heat radiating off blacktop? Black asphalt traps heat and releases it back into our cities. “But who said streets had to be black?” asked Ben Schiller, staff writer at Co.Exist. They pointed to Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s showcase of alternative paving surfaces to demonstrate how a parking lot alone can measure 40 degrees cooler if it’s lighter in color. In Los Angeles, you can visit TreePeople’s Center for Communitiy Forestry at our Coldwater Canyon Park headquarters to see this effect in action.… Read more >>

How TreePeople Catches Every Drop

Jim Hardie, TreePeople 216,000 gallon cistern

Is Los Angeles a desert? Our city gets about 15 inches of rainfall annually, slightly more precipitation than, say, Missoula, Montana (though we have fewer days per year that are considered “wet”). Did you know this is enough to serve a fairly large population and irrigate its urban greenery?

But every time it rains an inch in the city of L.A., 3.8 billion gallons of runoff are sent to sea, sweeping trash, toxins, and bacteria into waterways and polluting our beaches and ocean.… Read more >>