Concrete to Canopy: Green Dreams for Inglewood & Lennox

What comes to mind when you think of South LA? Endless stretches of treeless streets sealed in sizzling pavement?

Imagine if we could convert concrete to canopy one block, one person, one tree at a time.

Our climate reality has left frontline communities vulnerable to devastating impacts– like crippling heat and harmful floods. Inglewood and Lennox are prime examples, tucked away within the concrete-laden, tree-poor neighborhoods of South LA.

Left without adequate resources or enough life-saving tree canopy, these neighborhoods are at risk of damage from climate change’s extreme weather events and public health impacts, including pollution-triggered asthma and heat-related hospitalizations.Read more >>

TreePeople In the Trump-Era

 

My mom and I at the Women’s March in LA.

Fired up? Ready to go!

Last weekend, I marched through the streets of Los Angeles with my mom, TreePeople Founder Andy Lipkis and 750,000 beautiful people ready to stand up for an inclusive society that cares for our communities and our planet as the precious resources that they are.

I’ve spent my whole life fighting for social justice and our environment. Like all of us, I needed the warmth, love and energy that flowed like a mighty river through the streets of LA.Read more >>

Growing the Grassroots: Urban Forestry

Five years of drought has ravaged our urban forests and surrounding mountains. We’ve seen hundreds of millions of trees die in the Sierras and a massive hit delivered to our park and street trees– leaving our most vulnerable and differently-abled communities at the mercy of the sweltering heat.

This year, TreePeople will move forward on two major community greening initiatives – one in the Northeast San Fernando Valley and one in South LA.

With the Green Streets – Calles Verdes Project in the City of San Fernando, our goal is to create a “cool city” model to benefit one of LA’s most heat-impacted communities.Read more >>

TreePeople says YES on Measures A & M

This election, TreePeople is formally endorsing two LA County ballot initiatives: Measure A and Measure M. We strongly believe that if passed, these two initiatives will help make LA a more sustainable, climate-resilient, water-secure, and equitable region.

Here’s how:

Measure A, theSafe, Clean Neighborhood Parks, Open Space, Beaches, River Protection and Water Conservation Measure,” provides necessary funding to build new and maintain existing parks, beaches and recreational areas in every LA County community.

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TreePeople is saying YES to Measure A because it will protect and conserve water resources in and around parks and open spaces, and it will increases protective tree canopy to shade and cool communities.… Read more >>

#LAStormCatcher: Hope for LA’s Water Future

California is in the grips of a fifth year of drought, impacting our region’s water security.

However, Los Angeles County communities can achieve a climate-resilient future and adapt to the impacts of ongoing heat, drought and pollution. It’s not just something that TreePeople believes– it’s something we’re actively working toward in partnership with our region’s largest water agencies.

 

We want to create an entirely new system from one home at a time throughout all the cities in the County by reusing, recycling or recharging.

Read more >>

Protect your community: Take action for trees!

Have you heard? Last summer, TreePeople championed the protection of our urban trees as the City of LA prepared to launch its 30-year sidewalk repair program. Now, LA is starting to roll out steps to repair sidewalks across the region. That’s right–  over the next 30 years, the City plans to spend $1.4 billion dollars after a city settlement to make our sidewalks more accessible for all Angelenos.

A large piece of this effort will likely involve removing many street trees– trees that provide shade and cool spaces.Read more >>

Los Angeles Needs Stormwater Infrastructure

As a lifelong Los Angeles resident, I understand the extremes that mother nature can throw at us. I recall the droughts of my youth, when we were all urged to be thoughtful about our water use and conserve. I also remember vividly the opposite extreme, when that scarcity turned to plenty, neighborhoods flooded and streams and beaches poisoned by a toxic stew of polluted runoff.

Years later, as Assemblymember representing the San Fernando Valley and then as a LADWP Assistant General Manager, I began to look upon these weather extremes with a sense of obligation.… Read more >>