How Did Our Water Get Here?

25158759854_331dae433a_z

Here in LA, we expect to see clean drinking water flowing anytime we turn on a faucet. But have you ever wondered where that water comes from?

Tap water in the City of LA comes from several sources — and about 90% of it is imported. The sources we rely on primarily include:  

The Colorado River Basin and the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta  

Water from these two regions is managed by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). MWD is a water wholesaler (they sell to cities and utility agencies, which in turn sell to the public).Read more >>

My Hope Living on a Hurting Planet

16268137769_67ad8409b5_k

This year, several scientists intend to make history by declaring that our planet has officially entered the Anthropocene.

What is the Anthropocene?

We’re currently in the Holocene–a period where Earth’s patterns have been influenced by natural events. Unlike the Holocene, which began about 12,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age, the Anthropocene would be defined by the collective impact of human activity.  This new period is expected to have long-lasting and potentially catastrophic results, including pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, mass species extermination and so on.Read more >>

Statewide Campaign Launched to “Save Our Water and Our Trees” in Drought

19068017400_88a2e5d0d7_k

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: JULY 21, 2015

MEDIA CONTACT:

Jessica Jewell

Email: jjewell@treepeople.org

 

Statewide Campaign Launched to “Save Our Water and Our Trees” in Drought

TreePeople and other NGOs in partnership with SaveOurWater.org raise awareness to save urban canopy

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. – A consortium of urban forest and other concerned urban groups across California are releasing a simple yet urgent message: Save Our Water and Our Trees. The campaign raises awareness for the potentially millions of urban trees at risk in our state, and focuses on the importance of keeping them alive in the drought.… Read more >>

TreePeople’s Park Also Suffering From Drought

18808291362_617fce3679_k

This is—well, was—Elvis Presleaf, one of the oldest trees here in our park. After 80 years of life, Mr. Presleaf was just one of 18813838585_3399f1ee67_kdozens of trees in our park which have succumb to the debilitating drought.

Elvis played an important role in our Eco-tours. Over the past 20 years, he shaded nearly 200,000 visiting students at the Dirt Doctor Station, where kids learn the importance of soil.

It’s easy to forget how severely trees are affected by drought. After all, LA yards look pretty green.… Read more >>

The Artifice of Artificial Turf

Dominic Alves via Flickr Creative Commons

You may have been hearing a lot of praise for fake grass in the media lately, but I’m here to set the record straight: Fake turf does more harm than good.

I’m not sure when I started hating artificial grass. Maybe it was when my beloved grandmother planted fake flowers in her garden beds so the Easter photos would “turn out nice.” For the record, I tried to pick them, and everyone laughed at us.

16651954516_0944b5d0c5_k

But I think it has to do more with the sheer fact that fake grass, or it’s trendier name—frass—has no place in a sustainable landscape.… Read more >>

New Technology Helps Young Trees Take Root in the Angeles

featured

In the midst of this ongoing drought, it may seem daunting to plant new seedlings—especially in regions that have been devastated by fire. Fortunately, new technology out of the Netherlands might be the solution to our changing climate and drought-stressed forests.

The water in each reservoir can sustain a seedling for up to nine months.

The water in each reservoir can sustain a seedling for up to nine months.

It’s called the Land Life Cocoon, a product of Land Life Company, and it’s changing the way we’re looking at reforestation in some of the world’s most challenging environments.… Read more >>

Student Hacktivists Create Watershed Solutions for LA Schools

Hughes Middle School

This May, students from diverse communities across LA County gathered at Walt Disney Studios to participate in Generation Earth’s Streets to the Sea Challenge. The top performing teams had the opportunity to experience forward-thinking presentations on sustainability, as well as present their solutions to a panel of judges.

These kids got fired up!

 

Generation Earth, an environmental education program of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works presented by TreePeople, designed the challenge to inspire students to “hack” a stormwater pollution prevention plan to keep waterways and oceans clean.… Read more >>