Be Prepared: Eagle Scout Digs In

An Eagle Scout is always prepared– especially in the face of climate change.

Last month, Eagle Scout Wesley Wu worked with me, TreePeople’s Service Learning Manager and Youth Leader Specialist of Environmental Education, and a group of his peers to care for our park.

Enjoli, opening up the morning with the volunteers.

Wesley lead by example using his Eagle Scout training to rally over 40 students from six different schools across LA County to support one of our city’s most valuable resources– our trees.Read more >>

3,500 Join Us at the LA Environmental Education Fair

Our youth are the key for a climate-ready LA.

Last month, TreePeople’s Generation Earth team joined environmental education partners and agencies at the Los Angeles Environmental Education Fair (LAEEF) to educate and be inspired by LA’s next generation of climate champions. It was a packed day of fun at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden.

“LAEEF is a long-standing tradition that has reinvented itself from time to time to serve the changing needs of students, teachers, and schools.

Read more >>

Mulching: Less Mowing, More Growing!

It’s that time of year! Winter rains have come, the air is fresh, flowers are beginning to pop, and the days are warm and crisp. It’s the perfect time to look out over your yard and wonder:

“Is it time to finally ditch the turf and bring on the mulch?”

Not only does ditching turf mean less mowing, it also helps keep soil healthy and is a great way to cut back on water use. Sheet mulching is one way to remove it safely without poisonous chemicals!… Read more >>

Concrete to Canopy: Green Dreams for Inglewood & Lennox

What comes to mind when you think of South LA? Endless stretches of treeless streets sealed in sizzling pavement?

Imagine if we could convert concrete to canopy one block, one person, one tree at a time.

Our climate reality has left frontline communities vulnerable to devastating impacts– like crippling heat and harmful floods. Inglewood and Lennox are prime examples, tucked away within the concrete-laden, tree-poor neighborhoods of South LA.

Left without adequate resources or enough life-saving tree canopy, these neighborhoods are at risk of damage from climate change’s extreme weather events and public health impacts, including pollution-triggered asthma and heat-related hospitalizations.Read more >>

Viewpoint School Teacher Talks Trash and Compost

A sustainable future is in reach, but to get there we must plant the seeds of change in our youth today. This is why TreePeople has always invested in schools.

LA is one of the most wasteful cities in the country. But we know we can be better– through empowering kids to take action on their campuses and at home with their families.

The Viewpoint School in Calabasas is an example of putting this thought into action. Here, we teamed up with an amazing science teacher, Mr.Read more >>

UPDATE: $1.2 Million to Retrofit Homes to Capture and Infiltrate Rain

Yesterday, the LA County Board of Supervisors awarded TreePeople $1.2 million to pilot an innovative approach to home rainwater capture projects in unincorporated areas of LA County, with a focus on underserved communities. The project will help protect vulnerable communities from flooding, contribute toward our region’s water supply, improve water quality and offer water storage for later use.

It is part of a larger $4 million settlement between LA County and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and LA Waterkeeper. The settlement funds support home retrofits and green streets projects to capture rainfall, recharge groundwater and reduce polluted runoff from being purged into our rivers and ocean in neighborhoods with high climate-risk.Read more >>

Growing “Calles Verdes”: Restoring the Pacoima Wash

Nothing inspires me more than seeing people come together to make change.

Over the past couple months, TreePeople has worked to restore the Pacoima Wash with the help of our volunteers and the City of San Fernando. When we started, the area was overgrown with weeds and littered with trash, but after just a couple visits it already looks like it’s gotten the green treatment!

Did you know that the Pacoima Wash Greenway is also nature-based infrastructure? The 4.7-acre park diverts and cleans runoff from nearby neighborhood streets through a system of built and natural filters into a streambed or “arroyo.” Our recent winter rains has sprung the wash into action to capture and sink rain into the ground.Read more >>