My Hope Living on a Hurting Planet

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This year, several scientists intend to make history by declaring that our planet has officially entered the Anthropocene.

What is the Anthropocene?

We’re currently in the Holocene–a period where Earth’s patterns have been influenced by natural events. Unlike the Holocene, which began about 12,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age, the Anthropocene would be defined by the collective impact of human activity.  This new period is expected to have long-lasting and potentially catastrophic results, including pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, mass species extermination and so on.Read more >>

Calling all Water-Wise Students!

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Do you know a hard working, environmentally-minded student that would like an opportunity to win a trip on a marine science boat excursion, AKA, the Floating Lab? Invite them to join the Streets to Sea Challenge!

The Streets to Sea Challenge is an inter-school competition for 7th-12th graders that challenges students to create a campaign to promote a water-wise solution in their community. These solutions are aimed to address water pollution, capture, and conservation. 

How does it work?

Read more >>

Welcome our new CEO, Cindy Montanez

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We’re excited to announce the addition of former California State Assembly Member, Cindy Montañez as the new CEO of TreePeople. She will be working alongside our Founder and President, Andy Lipkis to meet the unique climate and environmental challenges our region faces.

Cindy is an Angeleno through and through, bringing extensive policy experience and deep community roots to our organization.

She was raised in the City of San Fernando, along with her five siblings, by parents who immigrated from Mexico. After attending UCLA, she was elected to the San Fernando City Council, later becoming Mayor.Read more >>

6 Years Healing a Burn Area Changed Me Forever

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The Sayre Fire of 2008 burned over 11,000 acres in Sylmar and resulted in the loss of nearly 500 homes. It was the worst loss of homes due to fire in LA’s history. That Thanksgiving, I happened to be taking my first trip to Los Angeles. I remember passing the destruction on the way out of town and feeling shivers at the charred landscape, a burnt-out bricolage of black, gray and ashen white. I had never seen evidence of a wildfire so close.Read more >>

ICYMI: TreePeople in the Sunday New York Times and Christian Science Monitor!

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Exciting news! This week, TreePeople’s rainwater capture leadership in a drought-stricken LA was highlighted in two national stories.

Last Sunday the New York Times’ piece, Storm Water, Long a Nuisance, May Be a Parched California’s Salvation, quoted our Founder and President, Andy Lipkis pointing out, “There’s a massive amount of water we throw away.” Even in 2013, the driest year on record, “it still rained 3.6 inches on Los Angeles, and we threw away 12 billion gallons.”

The Christian Science Monitor’s, How California residents are changing the water landscape,” featured our StormCatcher Project, “which aims to convert rainwater from flooding nuisance into an ally in Los Angeles’s quest to sustain local groundwater sources, improve flood control, and cut pollution reaching the Pacific Ocean during intense storms.Read more >>

WANTED: Friendly Faces to Empower LA!

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How did you first hear about TreePeople?

Probably word of mouth. Maybe a friend invited you to plant trees with them at one of our volunteer events, or shared one of our blogs on Facebook.

Word of mouth is a powerful tool. As a non-profit, it’s a tool we rely on to grow our organization and fulfill our mission of growing a greener LA.

Thankfully, we have an amazing crew of outreach volunteers to help. These special people are a friendly face in the community who represent us at special events all over Los Angeles County–community festivals, environmental fairs, concerts and so on.Read more >>

Let’s Reimagine our Water Supply

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It’s no secret. Los Angeles needs water.

Even with the promise of this year’s El Niño rains, California’s drought is expected to continue. It’s time to rethink how we use this precious resource.

Think about it. We import 80 percent of our water. In an average four-person household, 68 percent of our water is used for functions that don’t require drinking-quality water– like toilet flushing, landscape irrigation or washing clothes. Yet, that 68 percent is the same quality water as the water we drink.Read more >>