leremitaLinda Eremita

All articles by leremita

 

Seasons, Los Angeles Style

If you ask someoneto describe the four seasons (and I’m not talking about Vivaldi’s music or the hotel), you’ll most likely hear that fall is when plants slow down and begin to drop their leaves (if they’re deciduous), winter is when they sleep, spring is all about new growth, and summer is a burst of color. Then they say, “but we don’t really have seasons in L.A.”

Ah, but we do have seasons here. The earth travels around the sun on its tilted axis, giving us seasons.Read more >>

 

TreePeople’s Most Wanted: Home Edition

California’s native plants are under attack.

From our mountain habitats all the way down to our very backyard, invasive plant species are taking over. According to the U.S. Government, an invasive species is one that is non-native to the ecosystem and one whose introduction causes or will likely cause economic, environmental or human-health harm.

Invasive plants can often outcompete our natives because they don’t have the checks and balances they would have in their native land. Often this freedom leads them to grow faster and spread faster than the native plants they are replacing.Read more >>

 

How to Water Our Trees During the Drought

We live in a beautiful Mediterranean climate. Southern California is actually one of only five regions in the world with this climate – cool, wet winters and warm to hot, dry summers. But of those five, ours is the driest. Fortunately, our native plants have evolved to thrive here; they expect to get their moisture for the entire year from late fall to early spring.

Except not this year. This is the driest year on record, and even our native trees and shrubs are dying in the wild lands.… Read more >>

 

No Need to Plant-Sit These California Natives

Going on vacation? Trying to find someone to care for your garden while you’re away? Well, this amazing duo of SoCal natives goes on vacay with you, as they need almost no water in the summer. Black sage and Flannel bush will lounge around your garden, perfectly blending with the beautiful and laid-back vibe of the SoCal summer. So take your time off and come back home to a garden that will look as fab as you do!

Black sage (Salvia mellifera)
Evergreen shrub, California native measuring 5’ tall and 5’ wide.… Read more >>

 

Celebrate Urban Trees as Superheroes on National Arbor Day, April 26

U.S. Forest Service researchers have published compelling evidence* of urban trees’ immense carbon storage capacity. Along with the other many things they do to improve the environment, trees absorb carbon dioxide emissions from a multitude of pollution sources in our cities. “Thus,” the researchers conclude, “urban trees influence local climate, carbon cycles, energy use, and climate change.”

National Arbor Day is April 26. We join our friends at Alliance for Community Trees in the firm belief that reducing atmospheric CO2 is one of the most important functions of the urban forest—and that people can play a big role.… Read more >>

 

Grow a Fruit Salad on a Single Tree

Want to grow a fruit tree, but can’t decide which one? Wouldn’t it be great to have more than one type of fruit on a single tree? It’s possible to have this “fruit salad” effect in your backyard with the amazing technique of grafting.

Grafting is the process of splicing a branch or bud from one tree onto another tree. Grafting deciduous trees (trees that lose their leaves in winter) is done in winter when the trees are dormant, or leafless.… Read more >>

 

South L.A. Parents Learn to “Prune” Back Asphalt and Bring Nature to Urban School Yards

On a typical hot, smoggy Los Angeles school day, hundreds of children at South L.A. schools no longer have to broil in unshaded asphalt-covered school yards. Through TreePeople’s School Greening Initiative, South L.A. parents are being trained and supported to transform their children’s campuses into shadier, leafier, cooler—even food-producing—places to learn and play.

In early December, 25 area parents attended a half-day TreePeople workshop at San Pedro Elementary School—one of L.A.’s oldest and most urban campuses. There they learned how to prune fruit trees and organize community tree care teams to nurture the trees in their neighborhoods.… Read more >>

 

Acorns for Thanksgiving dinner?

Back before pilgrims and celebrations of food and football, at least 12 native California tribes depended on the acorns of coast live oaks and considered them a staple.

Beyond nourishing humans, California oaks are considered a keystone species, meaning that many other animals and plants depend on them and grow in relationship to them.  There are over 160 animal species and over 40 plant species that live in relation to California oaks.

With 19 different species of oak in California, there is about one for nearly every ecosystem – from our channel islands to the desert and areas in between.… Read more >>