edeguzmanEdith de Guzman

Edith de Guzman, Director of Research, Natural Urban Systems Group, has been with TreePeople since 2003, where she manages research into best practices for the sustainable transformation of the Greater Los Angeles area. Exploring environmental, social and economic aspects of urban ecosystems, she works to collect and disseminate research that identifies the efficacy, benefits and applicability of various approaches to urban sustainability, with a special focus on watershed management. Edith received a master's in Urban Planning from UCLA and a bachelor's in History/Art History, also from UCLA.

All articles by edeguzman

 

These Heat Waves Kill

They say some like it hot, but as the first significant heat wave of the season hits this week, many Angelenos will wish it was winter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year extreme heat causes more deaths in the United States than all other weather-related causes combined. In LA, the average five-day heat wave results in 4.1% more deaths than cooler weather on the first day, and 11.9% more on the fifth day.

Realistically, the coming heat event will result in some Angelenos going to the emergency room…and others dying at home.Read more >>

 

TreePeople & LA Take a Giant Step Toward Resilience

“Resilience is a value that guides everything we do in Los Angeles, because we know that the decisions we make today will shape the future our children and grandchildren will inherit. The Resilient Los Angeles plan will help us strengthen our infrastructure, protect our economy, make our institutions more inclusive, and create safer neighborhoods.”
– Mayor Eric Garcetti

Last month, the City of LA took a big step toward becoming more climate-ready when it published its first-ever Resilience Strategy. The strategy is part of the global 100 Resilient Cities effort pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation.Read more >>

 

Cooling LA to Save Lives

How do you cope with heat waves? Do you go swimming? Go to the movies? Crank up the air conditioning and stay home?

While these are all great options for most of us, many of these are not available to our fellow Angelenos. Half of LA’s households do not have air conditioning. For some households, turning on the A/C is not always an option when paying for electricity means less money for food or healthcare.

Imagine the people who rely on public transportation– these Angelenos have little to no protection as they fry in the sun on the way to work or school.Read more >>

 

#CoolMyCity: LA’s Urban Cooling Collaborative

LA just increased its coolness factor by $320,000!

On the heels of a sweltering summer, the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council of the U.S. Forest Service awarded the Los Angeles Urban Cooling Collaborative (LAUCC), a national partnership led by TreePeople, a $320,000 grant to fund life-saving urban heat research.

The LAUCC is a unique national partnership between nonprofit groups, universities, government agencies and other experts with a goal to create neighborhood-by-neighborhood prescriptions against heat. The Collaborative is developing the most effective dose of trees plus reflective roofs and surfaces in order to save lives and make LA more livable, both today and in tomorrow’s changing climate.Read more >>

 

LA’s Drought Conundrum

So the drought is over, right?
The short answer is well, maybe.

As the summer season swings into action and temperatures start to rise, it’s the perfect time to remember that as Angelenos, we all have the responsibility to act as stewards for our water and urban trees — even during a record-wet year like this one.

Whether or not we are “in drought” depends not only on the amount of rain we receive but also on temperature — as Peter Gleick, one of the brilliant minds at the Pacific Institute in Oakland has noted.Read more >>

 

Concrete to Canopy: Green Dreams for Inglewood & Lennox

What comes to mind when you think of South LA? Endless stretches of treeless streets sealed in sizzling pavement?

Imagine if we could convert concrete to canopy one block, one person, one tree at a time.

Our climate reality has left frontline communities vulnerable to devastating impacts– like crippling heat and harmful floods. Inglewood and Lennox are prime examples, tucked away within the concrete-laden, tree-poor neighborhoods of South LA.

Left without adequate resources or enough life-saving tree canopy, these neighborhoods are at risk of damage from climate change’s extreme weather events and public health impacts, including pollution-triggered asthma and heat-related hospitalizations.Read more >>

 

TreePeople and Metro Partner to Green Los Angeles

With the opening of the Expo Line extension last month and more on the way, Metro’s role in shaping Los Angeles has been on our minds. But did you know that Metro does more than build and provide public transportation?

TreePeople has partnered with the LA County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) to create Green Places, a resource toolkit to support communities in re-imagining and reinventing  their neighborhoods. The project is the result of months of work engaging dozens of experts, community organizations and Metro departments to create safe, healthy, livable communities that promote walking, biking and alternative forms of transportation.Read more >>

 

Dial “D” for Drought: Online Art Exhibition and Contest

We’ve all heard the news. California is in a severe drought, the worst in recorded history and possibly in 500 years. As of the week of February 25th, 91 percent of the state was experiencing severe to exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. California’s “Golden State” moniker is gaining new meaning as hundreds of thousands of acres of cropland go fallow and our state’s role as the nation’s breadbasket is threatened. And though California received a good soak late last month, the drought persists.… Read more >>

 

Learning from Australia’s Drought: TreePeople Draws Lessons From Down Under

In 2012, TreePeople began an exchange between government, research and community organizations in Australia and Southern California. The aim of the program: to share innovations, best practices and experience in urban rainwater capture, water conservation practices and drought response—topics that are increasingly relevant as the climate of the American Southwest (and beyond) changes for the drier.

Why Australia?

Australia experienced several devastatingly dry episodes in the last 100 years. The most recent—called the “Millennium Drought”—started in 1997 and continued through 2010, and brought the country’s longest period of rainfall shortage on record.… Read more >>