Plan Brings Hope for Locally Sourced Water

Did you know that only 11% of LA city’s water supply comes from local sources? What if we told you we could increase that number to thirty percent—or even forty five—by simply capturing rainwater? Thankfully, a partnership between TreePeople and the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power (LADWP) could make those estimates a reality.

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Currently, Los Angeles spends millions of dollars to import water from faraway places like the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains, Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta and the Colorado River.… Read more >>

The Artifice of Artificial Turf

Dominic Alves via Flickr Creative Commons

You may have been hearing a lot of praise for fake grass in the media lately, but I’m here to set the record straight: Fake turf does more harm than good.

I’m not sure when I started hating artificial grass. Maybe it was when my beloved grandmother planted fake flowers in her garden beds so the Easter photos would “turn out nice.” For the record, I tried to pick them, and everyone laughed at us.

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But I think it has to do more with the sheer fact that fake grass, or it’s trendier name—frass—has no place in a sustainable landscape.… Read more >>

Integrated Water Management: A Framework for Collaborative Governance

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Increasing Agency Collaboration for a Better Water Future

For the past two decades, TreePeople has been advocating for Los Angeles’ watersheds to be managed in a more integrated way. Our recent report, Moving Towards Collaboration: A New Vision for Water Management, lays out a path to achieve this and overcome common barriers to implementation.

After researching examples of integrated management from around the world, we developed a framework, focused on stormwater, as a resource for agencies and other leaders to consider future approaches that could positively impact their organizations and work.… Read more >>

On the Horizon: Collaborative Solutions to LA’s Water Crises

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TreePeople Releases Two Promising New Reports

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This historic drought is driving a thirst for solutions, and government agencies are responding with an openness to work together as never before. Over the past year, TreePeople has facilitated an exciting exploration of “collaborative governance” among agencies for innovative water management in the Los Angeles region. Our partners in this effort are the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works.… Read more >>

5 Reasons We Can’t Live Without Soil

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We love to sing the praises of our friends the trees, but we often forget about the critical resource right under our feet: the soil. Trees and other plants need healthy soil to thrive, but the scope of soil benefits go beyond planting.

Soil influences the life spans of our roads and highways. Healthy soil is the foundation for food, animal feed and fuel. Lumber, bricks and textiles all come from soil. Even important discoveries in the field of medicine can be linked to soil. … Read more >>

TreePeople’s Policy Work: Transforming LA into a Climate- and Water-Resilient City

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Each week, TreePeople is out in the neighborhoods and surrounding mountains of Los Angeles, planting and caring for trees and native plants to ensure that our city has a growing, thriving urban ecosystem. But that’s not all we do – every day, we’re also working with agencies and policymakers at the city, county, state, and federal levels to enact strong policies to support creating a 21st century infrastructure for a water-resilient LA.

As Deborah Weinstein Bloome, TreePeople’s Director of Policy, explains, policy work “has been part of our DNA from the beginning,” largely under the guidance of our founder and president, Andy Lipkis.… Read more >>

Transforming Upstream Landscapes for a Healthy LA River

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At the end of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to recommend approval for a $1 billion proposal to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River. According to the Los Angeles Times, the plan, which is supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti and a number of elected officials and advocacy groups – TreePeople included – “will restore habitat, widen the river, create wetlands, and provide access points and bike trails” along a portion of the river that runs north of downtown, through Elysian Park.… Read more >>