How to Kill Your Lawn

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Now that we’re in the depths of the drought, LADWP is offering $3 per square foot for turf replacement. Since some 50% of our water goes to landscaping, ripping out your lawn is one of the best ways you can conserve water.

How do you go about killing your lawn? Well, the easiest and best way to reduce your turf is sheet mulching. With sheet mulching, your yard can go from a water-thirsty, outdated green shag carpet to a sustainable garden with about as much effort as it takes to mow the lawn.… Read more >>

AB 2403 Sets the Stage for Stormwater Capture

Before and after the Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit, which reconfigured neighborhood infrastructure to increase stormwater filtration and capture.

It doesn’t rain much in Los Angeles, but it does rain: in an average year, enough rain falls throughout Los Angeles County to supply 650,000 families with enough water to live off if we captured it. For this reason, for more than twenty years TreePeople has been championing rainwater harvesting as a key part of our water supply. On June 28th, it became an even more economically and politically viable solution, as Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 2403 into law.… Read more >>

Transforming Upstream Landscapes for a Healthy LA River

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At the end of May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to recommend approval for a $1 billion proposal to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River. According to the Los Angeles Times, the plan, which is supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti and a number of elected officials and advocacy groups – TreePeople included – “will restore habitat, widen the river, create wetlands, and provide access points and bike trails” along a portion of the river that runs north of downtown, through Elysian Park.… Read more >>

Community Sustainability Workshop helps Angelenos respond to the drought

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The drought is here and with a heat wave to boot, Angelenos are starting to feel the effects of climate change. To help community members learn what they can do to create a more sustainable LA and help slow climate change, TreePeople held a Community Sustainability Workshop at our headquarters on May 3rd. Roughly 100 people attended, ready to learn how to harvest rain, rip up their lawns, create native plant landscapes, and plant trees in their communities.

At the event, people were thrilled to learn that they can make an impact.… Read more >>

Sustainable Spring! TreePeople’s 40th Birthday Bash, Garden Tours, DIY Workshops

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Are you ready to spring into ACTION this spring? We are! And we’ve got some amazing new helpers, too: we’ve partnered with AltBuild, the Theodore Payne Foundation, Mar Vista’s Green Garden Showcase and the Water Wise Expo to bring you a whole season of learning and proactive events to save water, harvest rain, and transform L.A.’s landscape for sustainability. Here’s the full line up. We hope to see you there!

SUNDAY, MARCH 16

Although it’s already come and gone, we kicked off Sustainable Spring with The Water Wise Expo at The Mar Vista Farmers’ Market, and it was a roaring success!… Read more >>

Can Captured Rain Be a Meaningful Part of LA’s Water Supply?

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Here’s a sobering statistic: for every inch of rainfall that falls in the City of Los Angeles, 3.8 billion gallons of water is lost to run off. In the last storm, even though only 3.29 inches of rain fell in Los Angeles, we lost 12.5 billion gallons of precious water. Add to that the fact that the city imports nearly 90% of its water supply, and you start to see how we could use every drop that falls.

So we’re thrilled that this is about to change.… Read more >>

TreePeople’s Rainwater Cistern Captures 81,000 Gallons of Water

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Over the course of the last week, we finally got some real rain. In fact, this is by far the most rain the greater L.A. area has seen since December 2010! Great news, indeed.

But was it enough to make a difference for our city and our trees in this awful drought?

Here at TreePeople, thanks to our underground rainwater cistern, the answer is yes: the rain helped alleviate the drought a lot. That’s because we were able to capture a whopping 81,000 gallons of water from the rooftops and parking lot at our headquarters!… Read more >>

Hope For Sale! (And It’s Absolutely FREE)

TreePeople Rainwater Harvesting Workshop

This past Saturday we hosted another of our Community Sustainability Workshops and got a standing-room-only crowd – maybe it’s the drought? Maybe it’s just that there are a lot of cool, in-the-know people?

Or maybe it’s actually because we sell hope. (Okay, we don’t sell it. We give it away for free!)

Yes, it’s the driest winter in recorded history and that fact alone can be a little depressing, paralyzing even. But that’s just one fact among many.

Here are a few other things we also know:

  • It will rain again.
Read more >>

California Drought: Survive and Thrive with TreePeople Solutions

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Part of our mission here at TreePeople is to be a source of practical information and solutions that can help keep every Angeleno safe and healthy, especially in times of extreme weather and natural forces such as the current drought emergency. Even in the face of projected hotter and more erratic weather patterns, we can still move the city towards a viable future – together.

The answer lies in taking care of our most vital resource for environmental well-being in urban areas: trees. Yes, many trees will need supplemental water to get them through the drought, but trees are still key to a sufficient local water supply in Los Angeles.… Read more >>

Enough For Us All! (But We Have To Do Our Part)

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“We have enough water to live on, but not enough to waste.” — Dorothy Green, founding president of Heal the Bay.

Dorothy Green wrote these words in an article that was published in the Los Angeles Times in 2008, shortly before her death. She went on to outline a thoughtful set of recommendations to create a sustainable water supply for Southern California.

So it is disheartening to see a Times article appear six years later that practically suggests that, despite this being the driest year in recorded history, everything’s fine.… Read more >>