How This LA Couple Replaced Their Lawn with Drought Tolerant Plants & Mulch

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Husband and wife Mark Rinaldi and Debbie Imsland have long been interested in sustainability. At home, they were conscientious about conserving water, taking care not to water the lawn too often or stay in the shower too long.

But it wasn’t until Debbie attended one of our Rainwater Harvesting Workshops that they considered making some major changes to their Gardena home. It started when they installed rain barrels in their yard, but it wasn’t long until they turned to their lawn.… Read more >>

KCET SoCal Connected: Capturing Rainwater One Rain Barrel at a Time

KCET SoCal Connected Interviews TreePeople's Andy Lipkis

Last month during the height of the scant LA rainfall, KCET SoCal Connected’s Val Zavala interviewed our Founder and President, Andy Lipkis on the importance of capturing every drop that falls to wean our city off imported water and strengthen our local water supply.

 Read on for the full story and be sure to watch his interview with Zavala.

You can bet that it doesn’t rain cats and dogs here in Southern California. But that’s no excuse not to prepare and capture the rain that does fall.… Read more >>

How to Take Charge of Your Water Supply and Harvest the Rain

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Would it sound crazy if we said you’re taking showers, flushing your toilet and watering your lawn with Evian water?

Pretty much. But Angelenos use about half of all their drinking-quality water for landscaping (!), 20% to flush their toilets and a whopping 18% for showering—If not exactly Evian brand, it’s water that could be saved for its most vital uses.

Imagine how many gallons of precious potable water that could be saved if we captured the rain. Not only would we significantly reduce our need for imported water (which makes up nearly 90% of LA’s water supply), but we’d also protect the dwindling fresh drinking water supply available.… Read more >>

AB 2403 Sets the Stage for Stormwater Capture

Before and after the Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit, which reconfigured neighborhood infrastructure to increase stormwater filtration and capture.

It doesn’t rain much in Los Angeles, but it does rain: in an average year, enough rain falls throughout Los Angeles County to supply 650,000 families with enough water to live off if we captured it. For this reason, for more than twenty years TreePeople has been championing rainwater harvesting as a key part of our water supply. On June 28th, it became an even more economically and politically viable solution, as Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 2403 into law.… Read more >>

No Need to Plant-Sit These California Natives

Black Sage and Flannelbush, photos by Donnella Anderson

Going on vacation? Trying to find someone to care for your garden while you’re away? Well, this amazing duo of SoCal natives goes on vacay with you, as they need almost no water in the summer. Black sage and Flannel bush will lounge around your garden, perfectly blending with the beautiful and laid-back vibe of the SoCal summer. So take your time off and come back home to a garden that will look as fab as you do!

Black sage (Salvia mellifera)
Evergreen shrub, California native measuring 5’ tall and 5’ wide.… Read more >>

Down from the Mountain as Another Season Closes

Photo: Julie Prejean

Ah, the sun has set on another seedling planting season in the Angeles National Forest. This year, Forest Aid: Angeles volunteers planted nearly 10,000 Jeffrey and Coulter pines, thanks to the management of the U.S. Forest Service, TreePeople mountain restoration staff, and the supervision of TreePeople’s dedicated volunteer group of Angeles Forest Restoration Supervisors.

There were stunningly beautiful days atop the mountain at Chilao Campground, where hundreds of seedlings went into the ground, planted by school groups and scout troops; corporate volunteers from companies all over the L.A.… Read more >>

How TreePeople Catches Every Drop

Jim Hardie, TreePeople 216,000 gallon cistern

Is Los Angeles a desert? Our city gets about 15 inches of rainfall annually, slightly more precipitation than, say, Missoula, Montana (though we have fewer days per year that are considered “wet”). Did you know this is enough to serve a fairly large population and irrigate its urban greenery?

But every time it rains an inch in the city of L.A., 3.8 billion gallons of runoff are sent to sea, sweeping trash, toxins, and bacteria into waterways and polluting our beaches and ocean.… Read more >>