Intern Spotlight: Rachael Tice

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This summer, as the sun began scorching the dry Los Angeles area, TreePeople and local high school kids joined together to rescue some very vulnerable young trees, and I got to be a part of it.

I was fortunate enough to lead 2 dedicated groups of upcoming seniors who made my job fun and easy. Both North Hollywood High School and Providence High School have dedicated Eco Clubs on their campuses, but students took drought response a step further over their summer vacations by adopting parks and performing weekly tree care and watering.… Read more >>

Water For Us All!

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“We have enough water to live on, but not enough to waste.” — Dorothy Green, founding president of Heal the Bay.

Dorothy Green wrote these words in an article that was published in the LA Times in 2008, shortly before her death. In it, she outlines an incredibly thoughtful set of recommendations that would create a sustainable water supply.

So it’s disheartening to see people acting in such a way that suggests we aren’t currently in the midst of the driest year in recorded history.… Read more >>

Intern Spotlight: Jazmine Saucedo

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My name is Jazmine Saucedo, and I am TreePeople.

Working with Jack London Continuation High School students through TreePeople’s Youth Summer Tree Care Project has definitely been the highlight of my summer. As a Summer Tree Care Intern, I encouraged and motivated students of underserved areas to care for their environment. This internship provided me with the awesome experience of educating at-risk youth about the importance of watering, caring for trees and working together to make our environment a better place.… Read more >>

Intern Spotlight: Elise Cabato

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My name is Elise Cabato and I Am TreePeople. I am currently a Youth Leadership Summer Tree Care Intern this summer for TreePeople. Before my internship I was just an incoming senior at UCLA studying Geography & Environmental Studies trying to get almost anything to build my resume before being thrown out into the real world. However, after the 9 weeks I’ve spent interning at TreePeople, I can confidently say that I have gained a new outlook on my future endeavors, the future of Los Angeles County, and the amazing organization that is TreePeople.… Read more >>

Greening Campuses and Cultivating Learners in Compton

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TreePeople has long believed in greening educational spaces: access to green space gives students a place to play and develop creative problem solving skills. Plus, research has shown a strong correlation between access to nature and better cognitive function, self-discipline, and impulse control, and suggests that greener campuses may help improve student attention spans. And at the very root of it, healthier school campuses mean healthier students, and the more trees and plants students have around them, the more likely they are to understand and respect our urban forest.… Read more >>

Volunteer Celebration 2014

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About a week ago, we hosted our annual Volunteer Celebration. This was a special opportunity for our highly dedicated volunteers to gather in a casual environment and get to know one another a bit better. We realize that it can be tough for staff and volunteers to get to know one another at forestry events, when the sweltering sun is beating down and there are trees to be planted and invasive species to be weeded, or at outreach events, when everyone is racking their brains to remember the multitude of ways to help get others involved with TreePeople.… Read more >>

TreePeople’s Policy Work: Transforming LA into a Climate- and Water-Resilient City

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Each week, TreePeople is out in the neighborhoods and surrounding mountains of Los Angeles, planting and caring for trees and native plants to ensure that our city has a growing, thriving urban ecosystem. But that’s not all we do – every day, we’re also working with agencies and policymakers at the city, county, state, and federal levels to enact strong policies to support creating a 21st century infrastructure for a water-resilient LA.

As Deborah Weinstein Bloome, TreePeople’s Director of Policy, explains, policy work “has been part of our DNA from the beginning,” largely under the guidance of our founder and president, Andy Lipkis.… Read more >>

TreePeople Volunteer Takes on the Drought

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This past Sunday, TreePeople staff and volunteers participated in a special tree care event in North Hollywood. One of our enthusiastic Volunteer Supervisors, Vahagn Karapetyan, had noticed that the trees in his neighborhood were suffering, so he decided to take action.

Vahagn Karapetyan has been volunteering with TreePeople for the past two and a half years. He first got involved as a graduate student at UCLA, looking for something to do on the weekends. He quickly moved up the volunteer ranks and became a Volunteer Supervisor, assisting staff at forestry events with a smile on his face and a seemingly endless supply of energy.… Read more >>

AB 2403 Sets the Stage for Stormwater Capture

Before and after the Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit, which reconfigured neighborhood infrastructure to increase stormwater filtration and capture.

It doesn’t rain much in Los Angeles, but it does rain: in an average year, enough rain falls throughout Los Angeles County to supply 650,000 families with enough water to live off if we captured it. For this reason, for more than twenty years TreePeople has been championing rainwater harvesting as a key part of our water supply. On June 28th, it became an even more economically and politically viable solution, as Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 2403 into law.… Read more >>

Fighting Drought One Lawn at a Time: LADWP’s Cash In Your Lawn Program

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One hundred percent of California is now in a severe drought, and Los Angeles County is even worse off, classified by the United States Drought Monitor  as in “extreme drought” conditions. Now, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is calling on Angelenos to do their part to conserve water—and as an incentive, they’ve upped their turf replacement rebate from $2 per square foot to $3.

Read more >>