Coast Live Oak Falls Prey to Gophers

gopher eaten stump

You know it’s dry when gophers start taking down trees.

Why is that? Well, normally tree roots make up part of your standard gopher diet. They’ll tunnel down to a tree’s root ball, chow down for a little while, and then move on. But as long as they only eat part of the roots – which is usually how it goes – the tree can still get plenty of nutrients and water from the soil, so it remains healthy. … Read more >>

TreePeople’s Ecological Restoration Team to the Rescue

Forty-five-acre Coldwater Canyon Park is home to TreePeople’s hilltop headquarters and the state-of-the-art Center for Community Forestry. Known to locals as a great hiking and dog-walking area, it’s one of the city’s valuable open spaces, and therefore home also to a myriad species of native plants and animals. As in other urban parks, though, its ecosystem is fragile and needs to be maintained.

TreePeople restores the park grounds with the help of a trained volunteer Ecological Restoration Team (ERT) that has evolved out of earlier teams of Americorps volunteers.… Read more >>

Take an Earth Day Walk in the Park

Laurie & Chip in Park Lisetee Fernandez March 2005IMG_7757_sm

At TreePeople we like to think of every day as Earth Day.  But that doesn’t mean we don’t love to celebrate April 22 as a great time to do something wonderful for the earth.

Still, maybe planting 100 trees or installing a rain garden at your local school is more than you can work into your schedule by this Monday. If that’s the case, we have the perfect solution—simply go outside!

Increasingly, studies show that although we are more disconnected from nature—to the point where it can be considered a disorder—even if we just take a short stroll in the park, the effects are amazing .… Read more >>

How TreePeople Catches Every Drop

Jim Hardie, TreePeople 216,000 gallon cistern

Is Los Angeles a desert? Our city gets about 15 inches of rainfall annually, slightly more precipitation than, say, Missoula, Montana (though we have fewer days per year that are considered “wet”). Did you know this is enough to serve a fairly large population and irrigate its urban greenery?

But every time it rains an inch in the city of L.A., 3.8 billion gallons of runoff are sent to sea, sweeping trash, toxins, and bacteria into waterways and polluting our beaches and ocean.… Read more >>