Angeles Restoration Campaign Update

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We’re seeing so many repercussions from 2013′s record dry year, and now that Governor Brown has declared a state-wide drought, cities, counties and government agencies are making decisions about how to reduce water use. But we’ve known for a long time that we need to drastically reduce the amount of water imported into the Los Angeles area, which is why we continuously call for better conservation and rainwater harvesting.

Still, despite our efforts, the current situation remains dire. Tough choices must be made.… Read more >>

Watts Neighborhood Kids Share Fruit Trees with Their Community

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Nearly thirty students in the Watts neighborhood of South Los Angeles rose at 7 AM last Saturday to spend the day at their high school Alliance Cindy and Bill Simon Technology Academy, or Simon Tech, as everyone seems to call it. If you know teenagers, this fact alone is remarkable. But it gets even better. They came not to play but to give away fruit trees and teach others how to plant them. Anyone in the community who wanted a tree —  apple or peach — could have one.… Read more >>

California Drought: Survive and Thrive with TreePeople Solutions

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Part of our mission here at TreePeople is to be a source of practical information and solutions that can help keep every Angeleno safe and healthy, especially in times of extreme weather and natural forces such as the current drought emergency. Even in the face of projected hotter and more erratic weather patterns, we can still move the city towards a viable future – together.

The answer lies in taking care of our most vital resource for environmental well-being in urban areas: trees. Yes, many trees will need supplemental water to get them through the drought, but trees are still key to a sufficient local water supply in Los Angeles.… Read more >>

Enough For Us All! (But We Have To Do Our Part)

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“We have enough water to live on, but not enough to waste.” — Dorothy Green, founding president of Heal the Bay.

Dorothy Green wrote these words in an article that was published in the Los Angeles Times in 2008, shortly before her death. She went on to outline a thoughtful set of recommendations to create a sustainable water supply for Southern California.

So it is disheartening to see a Times article appear six years later that practically suggests that, despite this being the driest year in recorded history, everything’s fine.… Read more >>

Start the New Year by Chipping Your Tree

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With the New Year comes lots of good intentions. Why not start with how you dispose of your holiday tree? If you’ve been thinking about trying to live a more sustainable lifestyle, you can look no further than your living room and that post-Christmas—or whatever holiday you celebrated—tree.

Rather than haul it out for the garbage collector, the best thing to do with your holiday tree is to mulch it. Chipping up your tree is a great way to create healthy, organic matter that is ideal to put on top of the soil—similar to what happens to dead trees in a natural forest.… Read more >>

Giving Back to the Universe

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When Dolores Reece decided to head an effort to revitalize the greenery in her Los Angeles neighborhood just north of the 10 Freeway, she felt as if it was something she was meant to be doing. A California native, Dolores grew up with a profound appreciation for the beauty of the natural world and our role in preserving it. However, she had been noticing that, either through lack of care or natural causes, trees in her neighborhood were dying. So, in the mid 1980s, when her children went away to college, she decided to rechannel her nurturing energy into replenishing the earth.… Read more >>

Plug-In to the Los Angeles Business Council Summit

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With TreePeople’s mission to inspire and engage people in making Los Angeles sustainable and healthy, we can’t ignore the role that our transportation system plays with its massive consumption of energy, and generation of CO2 and air pollution. Our streets, roads and highways are the primary mechanism whereby we pollute and throw away over $400 million worth of fresh, clean rainwater each year. And changing our transportation system provides a huge opportunity to help solve our long-term water issues.

TreePeople is working with multiple agencies, including METRO, to mitigate these problems by adapting their facilities so they capture, clean, conserve and use rainwater.… Read more >>

Ten Ways to Add Green to Your Routine

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Here at TreePeople, we believe that everyone is a bit of a tree person at heart. We understand that not everyone has time to regularly plant or care for trees, let alone dedicate a career to the environment! However, a busy schedule doesn’t doom a tree person to an environmentally-oblivious life. We’ve provided ten ways that you can fit the environment into your daily life—no extra time needed!

1. Don’t store food in plastic bags.
Instead, use containers (we prefer glass, stainless steel, or BPA-free plastic).… Read more >>

The LA River: From “Bad Dream” to Green

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Fed-up with the physical appearance of your neighborhood? Aching for a change? It’s simple, really; just jumpstart a stalled nonprofit! Meet Rick Rabins—husband, former jeweler, TreePeople Citizen Forester, and acting president of the nonprofit organization The Village Gardeners (his “full-time gig on the side”).

Rick Rabins’ story begins when he realized an oleander scorch disease was wiping out the plants in front of his house on the Los Angeles River. “After having a beautiful hedge like that….” he reflects, “having that deadwood—it’s like a bad dream.” Determined to reverse the process, he knocked on doors of his neighbors until one referred him to Annette Fuller—an original founder of what would become The Village Gardeners.… Read more >>

“When I find something that I like…I dive in head first,” Amelia Litz, TreePeople Volunteer

Amelia Litz - Outreach Volunteer of the Year 2012

Three years ago, Amelia Litz was looking for something to do after high school. This South Dakota native knew she wanted to get into something “environmental sciency,” but she didn’t know exactly what. She then found TreePeople through a Google search and has never looked back. “When I moved out here, I decided the best way to explore my options was to volunteer,” Amelia explains. “TreePeople makes it really easy for you to get involved.”

Amelia works primarily in the Santa Monica Mountains.… Read more >>