7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest

16432503970_7fc3386a37_o

Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>

I Am TreePeople: Tim Douglass

15856678164_db25123b38_o

“Some of these trees that l’m planting today I may not see in my lifetime, but I know that my kids’ kids could sit under one of these trees.”

TreePeople has a legacy of inspiring activism, but it’s the stories of our volunteers that inspire us to keep coming together to build a sustainable future.

Meet Tim Douglass, a TreePeople volunteer and Mountain Forestry Supervisor.

 

“We only have one environment and we have a responsibility to take care of it.”

Tim got involved with TreePeople after the Angeles Forest “Station Fire” of 2009.… Read more >>

I Am TreePeople: Maya Alarcon

TreePeople Outreach Volunteer, Maya Alarcon

TreePeople Outreach Volunteer, Maya Alarcon

I Am TreePeople: Maya Alarcon

 TreePeople has a legacy of mobilizing communities. But it’s the stories of the people at the roots of our work that inspire us every day to keep greening our city for generations to come.

Meet Maya Alarcon, a TreePeople volunteer and the first in the lineup for our story series, “I Am TreePeople.”

How did you hear about TreePeople? 

Maya heard about TreePeople all the way back in her early childhood in the 80’s when she visited Coldwater Canyon Park on a field trip.… Read more >>

Where did 356 sq ft of Asphalt go at El Dorado Elementary School?

El Dorado Elementary School students at a TreePeople planting

Across two weekends last month, more than 200 volunteers, kids, parents, teachers and TreePeople staff gathered to put 46 trees in the ground at El Dorado Elementary School in Sylmar, deep in the San Fernando Valley.

Volunteers watch a tree planting demonstration at El Dorado Elementary School.

Volunteers watch a tree planting demonstration at El Dorado Elementary School.

Volunteers watch a tree planting demonstration at El Dorado Elementary School.

We primed the location ahead of the big day by tearing out 356 sq ft of asphalt to give the trees a nice, porous home to lay their roots in.… Read more >>

How to Give and Get

Lake View Terrace Volunteers

TreePeople is kicking off 2015 by offering new perks to our most dedicated volunteers. Whether you’ve only volunteered with us once, or if you’re a seasoned veteran, we want to recognize the important work you do to make LA a green, livable city.

This year, if you attend five or more volunteer events we’ll award you free passes to a Moonlight Hike for you and a friend. These monthly group hikes are a fun, unique way to experience our beautiful 45-acre Coldwater Canyon Park and its surrounding trails by the light of the moon.… Read more >>

Volunteer Spotlight: Wendy Hagan

Granada Hills Charter High School forest restoration voluntere

TreePeople fosters relationships—with the Earth, our cities and with each other, no matter our ages or backgrounds. It’s this multi-generational value that forges lasting bonds and a passion to cherish and protect the environment. Enter Wendy Hagan, a local science teacher at Granada Hills Charter High School. Her story dates back years ago. A native Southern Californian, she volunteered with us back when she herself was in elementary school.

“I remember going to a TreePeople event with my school when I was in the 5th grade.… Read more >>

Concrete and Mulch: Industrial Downtown gets the Green Treatment

Coach Ron cares for trees in LA's downtown

Skid Row and its surrounding communities often are labeled with associations of sprawling concrete and warehouses, rampant homelessness, drug use and destitution. Though green spaces and trees aren’t a big part of the landscape (yet), this neighborhood is a vibrant corner of the city that offers a place to begin again to its residents who often have nowhere else to go. There is a thriving art scene, colorful community and a palpable sense of altruism here that often goes uncelebrated by the mainstream.… Read more >>