Yes, We Can Save Water (and Save Trees)

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Yesterday California Governor Jerry Brown issued the first mandatory water restrictions in response to our state’s historic drought. As this drought deepens and worsens and fears rise, it’s important to know that another country faced a very similar threat: Australia endured a devastating 12-year drought from 1997 – 2010. Because they have similar climate, and very similar people and economy, their story, their powerful successes, and some of their painful mistakes and lessons can serve as a guide to us in Los Angeles and California…to ensure we succeed and thrive.  … Read more >>

Make No Mistake: Concrete is the Enemy

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Statement from Andy Lipkis, Founder and President of TreePeople, calls on Angelenos to rip out concrete and plant trees to capture what rainfall LA gets.

LOS ANGELES, Calif.– TreePeople heard fighting words when news reports showed an anti-tree group calling themselves “Save Our Concrete” holding a protest at a downtown Los Angeles parking lot earlier today.

The truth is that concrete is the enemy of Los Angeles. It is the enemy because, among other reasons, as LA suffers through historic drought, concrete takes away our water.… Read more >>

Trees In the City Make Us Safer, Happier, and Healthier

Trees are often touted for providing shade, cleaning our air and capturing the rain, but did you know trees also are living anti-depressants?

Recent studies show that trees make city-dwellers happier, healthier and more connected to their communities. Just a few of the reasons you should hug a tree today.

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The Mind-Body-Tree Connection 

Now that more than half the world’s population experiences the stress related to modern city life, urban green spaces are more important than ever for our collective and emotional well being.… Read more >>

Skip the Artificial Turf: The Value of Native Plants and the Truth About Fake Grass

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For decades Angelenos have maintained an image of the perfect suburban yard. We imagine homes with neatly trimmed hedges, colorful flower beds beneath the windows and a lush, green, well-manicured lawn rolling right up to the front door.

The perpetuation of this image has skewed our sense of natural beauty. Not only is that ideal simply not sustainable in our climate, but in order to achieve it people sometimes turn to what they think is a good alternative: artificial turf. In other words, fake grass.… Read more >>

Cómo Colocar la Pedacería Orgánica (Mulch)

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La gente necesita árboles y los árboles necesitan la gente.

Una vez que el árbol esta sembrado, todavía necesita su ayuda para crecer fuerte y sano. Cubriendo el área alrededor del árbol con un grueso manto de abono (rallado o corturas de madera) ayuda crear un ambiente saludable en la tierra, que es vital para su crecimiento y ayuda que los árboles crecen en la clima seca de LA.

Mira este video para saber cómo empezar a cuidar sus árboles. ¡Es fácil!… Read more >>

Happy World Water Day, LA – There’s Hope Yet

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TreePeople Founder and President, Andy Lipkis

TreePeople Founder and President, Andy Lipkis

Water scarcity is certainly a worldwide issue, but we in LA know the seriousness of it. Did you know that California has only about one year of water supply left in its reservoirs?

The good news is that our city is getting serious about creating a local, reliable water supply – and TreePeople is helping to bring to it the best global models.

TreePeople has been intensely involved in solving LA’s local water problems since the 1990s.… Read more >>

7 Reasons to Volunteer In the Angeles National Forest

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Only a massive effort by TreePeople volunteers makes it possible to replant and restore the fire-damaged areas of the Angeles National Forest.

1. You’ll help restore the forest’s pristine beauty.

Angeles Forest Restoration

In 2009, 161,000 acres (approximately 25%) of the Angeles National Forest was destroyed by fire stripping the forests of Manzanita, sumac, sycamore and pine trees. 11,000 of those acres burned too deep for the forest to recover through natural processes.

Since then, working with the U.S. Forest Service, we’ve relied on volunteers to care for new saplings and help plant new trees while the soil conditions and temperature are optimal.… Read more >>